Storage tips

  • Check for spoilage

    Storage tips

    This is steam coming off canola heating due to high moisture. This was not a welcome sight for the grower.

    Steam coming out of bin doors or snow melting off one bin while remaining on others is a quick clue — but don’t use these as your only indicators! Spoilage usually starts small. Even with temperature cables, start points are not always detected until some of the grain is already damaged.

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  • Keep an eye on bags, patch holes

    Storage tips

    A clump of spoiled canola from the U of M's bag storage study. This canola went into the bag at 12% moisture. Credit: Angela Brackenreed

    If leaving bags for the winter, watch them regularly. Feel them for warm temperatures. Probe them if possible. Tape up any holes that may occur due to wildlife or any other damage. Spoilage in bags often starts around holes.

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  • What to do with high-moisture canola?

    Storage tips

    Canola harvested tough or damp can be quite volatile in storage. While cool temperature can reduce the risk significantly, keeping the whole bin consistently cool until delivery can be a challenge and a risk. These steps will help improve conditioning results and reduce risk….

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  • ALERT: Canola is heating!

    Storage tips

    Heated canola, the brown burned seeds, mean an immediate downgrade.

    Delivery points report a spike in heated canola. Check all canola bins as soon as possible.

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  • What to do with high-moisture canola?

    Storage tips

    Weather is finally allowing for some harvest to resume across the Prairies, but the concern now is how to handle canola that could come off very tough, or damp. These steps will help improve conditioning results and reduce risk….

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  • Factors that elevate storage risk

    Storage tips

    How do moisture, green seeds, weed seeds, hot canola and chaff increase the storage risk?

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  • Bag storage short term, especially for tough canola

    Storage tips

    A clump of spoiled canola from the U of M's bag storage study. This canola went into the bag at 12% moisture. Credit: Angela Brackenreed

    Canola at moisture levels above 12% should only be stored for three to four weeks to avoid deterioration of quality.

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  • Check your bins

    Storage tips

    Moving canola from one bin to another is a good chance to cool it off, break up any potential hot spots and give the grain a good inspection.

    While the priority is on combining for many canola growers this November, please take time to check the storage situation for canola already harvested.

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  • Alert: What to do with high moisture canola?

    Storage tips

    Weather is finally allowing for some harvest to resume across the Prairies, but the concern now is how to handle canola will undoubtedly come off very tough, or damp. Try to make a plan prior to taking it off the field, as even at low temperatures the bulk will likely be quite volatile. Spoilage can occur rapidly. These steps will help improve conditioning results and reduce risk:

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  • Tips for drying tough and damp canola

    Storage tips

    Canola is considered “tough” at moisture levels between 10% and 12.5%. “Damp” is anything above that. With tough canola, aeration can be enough to dry it to safe storage levels as long as air has capacity to dry: warm with low relatively humidity (RH). At RH values above 70%, the equilibrium moisture content will be above 8% to 9%, meaning sufficient drying for safe long term storage is difficult to achieve. Drying canola with aeration alone also requires sufficient air flow and time to move the drying front to the top of the grain mass. Damp canola will require heated air drying and rigorous management to condition it for safe storage.

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