Frost

  • Novel products: Run your own tests

    Frost

    Rescue treatments for hail, excess moisture and other stress factors are rarely tested in broad scientific studies. Growers considering these treatments have to remember the decision comes down to “buyer beware”.

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  • Top 10 things to look for after emergence

    Frost

    Crucifer and striped flea beetles are feeding together in this crop. Credit: Brent Wiebe

    Flea beetles are just one thing to look for while scouting one to three weeks after seeding.

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  • Frost: Canola’s resilience may surprise you

    Frost

    May seeded plots show evidence of frost damage but the surviving plant population is still very good.

    Canola seedlings at the canolaPALOOZA site in Lacombe, Alberta, were hit by three -4°C frosts and one -3°C frost over a five-night period May 10-14. Yet photos taken the morning of May 16 show that a decent number of seedlings survived.

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  • Scouting: The critical first 21 days

    Frost

    The seedling on the left has wirestem.

    The week after seeding is a good time to verify seeding depth and to check seeds and seedlings for rots and blights. Disease damaged seed and seedlings die quickly, and may be gone within a few days, which is why this timing is important to an accurate diagnosis.

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  • Reseeding: The May option

    Frost

    Yield potential for canola seeded in late May is not as high, generally, as canola seeded in early May, but it is still pretty good and better than for canola seeded in June. Given the current date, the argument in favour of reseeding a crop clearly thinned out and set back by frost or any other issue may have more merit.

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  • How to assess frost damage on young canola

    Frost

    Frost on vol canola 2 Ward

    After a frost, it can take a few days to accurately determine how many plants survived, and whether the stand is still uniform. Be patient before making any decisions.

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  • Spring frost risk and seeding date

    Frost

    Average last day for a 0°C frost in Saskatchewan. CLICK TO ENLARGE

    Seeding date decisions are often driven more by historical frost risk than present conditions. That is why many growers will not seed canola before May 1, even if their area had what seemed like favourable seeding conditions in April. Historical frost risk can be interpreted differently based on the crop’s frost tolerance and the grower’s appetite for risk.

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  • PODCAST: Spring frost risk and seeding date

    Frost

    Ralph Wright, who leads the agro-meteorology division with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, joins Canola Council of Canada agronomy specialist Autumn Barnes and host Jay Whetter in a discussion about frost risk and canola seeding dates. While the discussion focuses on Southern Alberta, growers and agronomists in all regions will learn from the discussion about frost […]

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  • Dockage, tough stems and combine settings

    Frost

    Dockage screen elevator

    Three concepts to consider while setting the combine this harvest: (1) Can dockage be too low? (2) Change combine settings based on crop conditions. (3) Frost damaged seed might not be a total write off.

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  • Reassess reseeding: Check yield and quality

    Frost

    Reseeding looked like the right idea in many areas throughout the summer, but the real test is at harvest. If there was no risk of frost and the significant loss of grade and yield that results, we’d have a lot more canola go in after the soils reached 10°C and the spring frost risk was […]

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