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  • Reduce costly harvest losses — tips

    Canola producers can lose up to five bushels or more per acre if the combine isn’t adjusted properly. Here are tips to measure combine losses and make adjustment to limit those losses, putting more canola in the bin and reducing the volunteer canola seedbank in your fields.

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  • UCC 2014: Portage la Prairie, Manitoba

    First flower July 7

    UCC 2014 at CMCDC is a canola production trial intended to showcase three styles of input/cost management. Each treatment will have different cost of production budgets to work with, reflecting corresponding yield goals and a set selling price of the canola. A “winner” will be determined at the end of the season based on return on investment (ROI).

    The photo shows first flower, July 7.

    3 treatments:
    1) “No Frills” — reduced cost/ reduced inputs: Goal is to reduce costs and reach an average area (RM of Portage La Prairie) yield
    2) “Input Optimization” — mid cost/ mid input: Goal is to have solid “ROI” with a realistic but ambitious yield goal
    3) “Take it to the Max” — high cost/ high input: Goal is to push the limits on yield

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  • Ultimate Canola Challenge – Alberta

    Gopher damage to canola leaves. Farming Smarter staff have been trapping gophers at the Lethbridge UCC site to keep damage to a minimum.

    Gophers are the latest threat at the UCC site in Lethbridge. This plant has suffered some feeding damage.

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  • Field Diagnostics Checklist

    This is a companion file for the Canola Diagnostic Tool. The diagnostic tool asks questions to come up with a short list of potential causes for an observed problem in a canola field. The more questions you answer, the more refined the search. Going through this checklist ahead of time will make answering the questions easier and more accurate.

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  • Agriculture labs

    Here is a list of labs that service canola growers in Canada. Labs are organized under the following headings: Soil nutrient analysis, Plant tissue nutrient analysis, Seed quality tests, Disease diagnostic on plant tissue, Soil analysis for clubroot, Herbicide resistant test for weeds, Herbicide carryover in soil, and Pesticide residue in plant tissue

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  • CCAs: Canola Watch exam worth 6.5 credits

    The Canola Watch 2012 exam for Certified Crop Advisors (CCAs) is now available. Successful completion of the exam is worth 6.5 credits. Complete the exam by December 31, 2012 to qualify for 2012 credits. Complete the exam between January 1 and January 31 to qualify for 2013 credits.

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  • Weather and herbicide performance

    Herbicide performance is on a sliding scale depending on the weather. Cloudy days with highs of 10 C after a night near 0 C will tend to result in herbicide performance at the low end. Sunny days with highs of 15 C after a night of 3 C will provide improved control. Sunny days with highs of 20 to 25 C after a night of 10 C will provide optimum control.

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  • Attend our Seeding for Success webinar

    Canola growers and agronomists facing last minute seed and fertilizer purchases, and who are wondering about seeding rates for large-sized seed, will benefit from a Canola Council of Canada (CCC) webinar this Thursday. The one-hour webinar, called “Seeding for Success,” is May 3, at 9:00 a.m. CDT.

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  • Hone your diagnostic skills at CanoLAB 3-D

    CanoLAB 3-D is a unique chance to see what real canola plants look like when they are suffering from various stresses at different growth stages. The interactive and hands-on lab will run March 5 and 6 at Hole’s new Enjoy Centre in St. Albert, Alberta. Registration opens February 6 at 9:00 a.m. MST. Space is limited to 100 people per day, and spots will fill fast.

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  • Clubroot intensifies, check fields

    Growers in fringe areas where clubroot is at low levels or has not yet been detected are encouraged to check their fields. Noticing the disease before it gets serious is an important step in long-term clubroot management.

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  • Bertha armyworm near economic thresholds

    Canola growers in pockets across the Prairies are seeing a rise in bertha armyworm feeding. Check your fields, know the economic thresholds, and be mindful of bees when spraying.

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  • Tips to prepare for harvest

    Many crops are nearing the end of flowering or podding. Harvest decisions should be contemplated in the coming weeks. The following are tips to consider during the lead up to harvest.

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  • Lygus threat minimal at bud stage

    Insecticide to stop lygus bugs from feeding on canola at the bud stage is rarely effective or economical. Under good growing conditions, canola can grow through this early damage without any yield loss. Instead of spraying, step up monitoring and proper sweep net sampling and be ready to take action at the pod stage if necessary.

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  • 12 tips for better spraying results

    Here are a few key tips to lure you in: Spraying at the right time is more important than how you do it. Choose a herbicide that can handle large droplets. Keep your boom low. Read on for more tips and details.

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  • Did you walk your fields today?

    Small and vulnerable canola plants face many threats during their first three weeks. The crop may need your protection to get through these stages with its top-end yield potential intact. Canola growers are encouraged to walk their fields a couple times a week — or more — until plants are firmly established and growing strong.

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  • Cutworm management tips

    Canola growers should scout emerged canola crops for bare patches, holes or notches in foliage, and clipped plants — telltale signs of cutworm feeding. At least four cutworm specifies damage canola: dingy, redbacked, pale western and army. Here is information on identification, scouting, acceptable damage thresholds, and control.

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  • Top dress tips for nitrogen and sulphur

    Ideal timing for nitrogen fertilizer application is at seeding. This saves an extra pass over the field and ensures that the expected nitrogen requirement is in place when the crop needs it. But there are times when an in-crop top up of nitrogen or sulphur makes sense.

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  • Video- Insect Update 2011

    Scott Meers, the provincial entomologist for Alberta, provides an insect forecast for 2011 in this video provided by the Government of Alberta. Please click on the following link to access the Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development video: http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$Department/deptdocs.nsf/All/info13610

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  • Estimating flea beetle damage in canola

    Flea beetles are the most chronically damaging insect pest of canola in western Canada. Direct losses to oilseed production average 8-10% of the annual crop yield, and in outbreak years flea beetles can cause hundred of millions of dollars damage.The nominal economic threshold for flea beetles in canola crops in Canada is an average defoliation level of 25% or more of the seedling leaf area. Images and descriptions in the following article will help growers determine if a foliar insecticide is necessary to protect their canola from flea beetles.

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  • How to determine when to swath

    Watch CCC agronomy specialist Jim Bessel explain how to do a seed-colour change assessment.

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  • Consider herbicide carryover before seeding

    Consider potential herbicide carryover before seeding canola on any field.

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  • Cutworm watch begins at crop emergence

    Given the rush to complete the seeding task, growers can’t forget to scout their already emerged crop. Keep an eye out for cutworm damage.

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  • Lygus bugs feeding at the bud stage

    Lygus feeding at the bud stage is rarely an economic cost — unless the canola is under some other stress, such as drought. Stressed canola may not be able to compensate for lost buds the way a healthy crop can.

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  • How to take a plant stand count

    Knowing your plant stand is the best way to understand how your fields should be managed for the rest of the season. It will also help in managing your seeding rate for the future. Here’s how to do a count.

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  • How to evaluate clubroot losses

    Got stressed looking plants? When scouting, check for clubroot. Growers who seeded clubroot-resistant hybrids should know that low-level infection — up to 8% — is normal for these hybrids.

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  • The critical first 21 days

    Young canola plants are vulnerable to numerous stresses, particularly flea beetles, cutworms and seedling diseases. It pays to scout often at this time of the season.

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  • Selecting a new variety — tips

    Here are tips on how to test new varieties and where to find yield and other performance comparisons.

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  • Scout the whole field for flea beetles

    Scouting for flea beetles at field edges works early in the season when conditions are cool. With warmer weather, flea beetles will have moved throughout canola fields.

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  • Early weed control is ideal

    Take a close look at the weed spectrum and stage in each field prior to seeding. It may be worth controlling those weeds before seeding, since early emerging weeds out-compete young canola for nutrients and moisture and can significantly reduce yield potential.

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  • Fall soil tests — tips

    Wait until soil temperatures drop below 7°C before sampling. Microbial processes in the soil slow down at cooler temperatures, so samples taken from cool soils provide a closer estimation of nutrient levels at seeding next spring.

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