Swede midge

  • New midge video

    Swede midge

    The Canola Council of Canada has a new video describing swede midge, its life cycle and the damage it can cause canola crops in Western Canada. The video also mentions the new midge that is similar to but distinct from swede midge.

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  • New midge in canola

    Swede midge

    Distorted canola growth thought to be from swede midge (Contarinia nasturtii) is likely caused by two separate midge species. Scientists were suspicious that two midge species were present in canola in Western Canada when pheromone traps specific to swede midge were not catching any even though midge were present at relatively high numbers in fields […]

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  • Swede midge update

    Swede midge

    Alberta Agriculture & Forestry surveys detected swede midge larvae within flower buds at multiple sites — but densities were very low. Preliminary data indicates that distribution of swede midge within Saskatchewan has increased in 2016 compared to 2015.

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  • Aster yellows or swede midge or thrips?

    Swede midge

    Aster yellows in canola

    Misshapen sack-shaped pods are often the result of aster yellows.

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  • Insect scouting: What may you find?

    Swede midge

    Lygus bugs make an appearance at canolaPALOOZA.

    Lygus is one insect you may find in canola this week, but spraying lygus before pod stages rarely provides an economic benefit. Lygus do most of their damage at the pod stages.

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  • Ontario updates swede midge infosheet

    Swede midge

    Swede midge larva in canola flower bud. Credit: Tyler Wist

    Tracey Baute and Meghan Moran with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs and Dr. Rebecca Hallett at the University of Guelph, School of Environmental Sciences, have a new infosheet to help Ontario canola growers manage the insect.

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  • Insect review: 3 podcasts and a tiny survey

    Swede midge

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  • Insect update: Swede midge, diamondback, flea beetles, lygus

    Swede midge

    Flea beetles on canola pod.

    Flea beetles have been observed in high numbers in some fields. Adults emerge from pupae in August and overwinter to feed on young canola seedlings the following spring. These same adults do feed now, but are rarely an economic concern because high numbers tend to be concentrated.

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  • Insect update: Lygus, bertha, swede midge, CSPW

    Swede midge

    Lygus hotspots: Lygus numbers are high in some regions, with reports of 70+ per 10 sweeps in some fields in central and northern Alberta. Some fields will warrant a spray, but seeing the plane next door does not mean all canola in the area should get sprayed. Assess each field.

    Bertha armyworm hotspots: Berthas are a very low numbers in most areas, but there are a few hotspots. Bertha numbers can be high in one field, or even in areas within a field, and not a threat at all in fields close by. Assess each field.

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  • New swede midge locations

    Swede midge

    Swede midge larvae inside floret. Source: Julie Soroka, AAFC

    A swede midge infestation has been confirmed near Meota, Saskatchewan, well outside the Nipawin-Carrot River epicentre. Higher numbers have also been reported near Hudson Bay, Saskatchewan, indicating an eastward migration as well. But while the insect seems to be spreading in distribution, overall numbers and levels of damage are down this year across the province.

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