Seeding date

  • How late is too late to seed canola?

    Seeding date

    Factors in this decision are maturity of the variety, average date of first fall frost, crop insurance deadlines and profit potential of alternative crops.

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  • Insurance deadlines and last-frost dates

    Seeding date

    AFSC in Alberta has extended its recommended seeding date deadlines for yield and quality coverage to June 5 for Argentine canola and June 15 for Polish canola. The original deadline was May 31. Yield-only insurance deadline is still June 20. Read more.

    For seeding deadlines in Saskatchewan contact your local SCIC office. Find office contacts and more information here.

    Seeding deadlines for Manitoba are June 15 for Argentine canola in risk area 1, June 10 for Argentine canola in risk area 2 and June 20 for Polish. Read more.

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  • An objective view on seeding dates

    Seeding date

    Many areas of the Prairies — particularly central and north regions — are at least one to two weeks away from seeding. This would put seeding at mid to late May. Those dates are still good for yield potential and are within crop insurance deadlines.

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  • Common questions for wet and unharvested acres

    Seeding date

    CCC agronomists are getting three common questions with regard to wet fields and unharvested. They are:

    1. What if I plant canola on canola acres that are still not harvested?
    2. What can we expect for seed mortality in excessively wet soils?
    3. What to do about ruts?

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  • By May, soil temperature less important for seeding decisions

    Seeding date

    By early May, soil temperature at 1” depth — the canola seed zone — often exceeds this temperature during the day and should get continually warmer with each day. For this reason, soil temperature in May is less of a factor in the seeding-start decision than it would be in April.

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  • How early is too early to seed?

    Seeding date

    Past experience would suggest that starting on peas and maybe some cereals in mid April would be the preferred early-seeding choice, with canola going in late April and early May. Growers may see value in experimenting with one early-seeded canola field, but other crops tend to be better options for seeding in mid April.

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  • Help for the reseeding decision

    Seeding date

    Thin stand small

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  • Frost: Canola’s resilience may surprise you

    Seeding date

    May seeded plots show evidence of frost damage but the surviving plant population is still very good.

    Canola seedlings at the canolaPALOOZA site in Lacombe, Alberta, were hit by three -4°C frosts and one -3°C frost over a five-night period May 10-14. Yet photos taken the morning of May 16 show that a decent number of seedlings survived.

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  • Seeding date and yield — graphs

    Seeding date

    Alberta data showing relationship between seeding date and canola yield in the Black Soil Zone. Source site: http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/crop5758

    Seeding early May versus late May or early June, providing that crop conditions allow for it, is a relatively low cost way to increase yield and profit from the crop.

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  • Reseeding: The May option

    Seeding date

    Yield potential for canola seeded in late May is not as high, generally, as canola seeded in early May, but it is still pretty good and better than for canola seeded in June. Given the current date, the argument in favour of reseeding a crop clearly thinned out and set back by frost or any other issue may have more merit.

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  • Dry soil: Seed now or wait?

    Seeding date

    If the choice is to seed canola now into dry soil or wait until after it rains, seeding into dry soil is a workable option.

    Drill is ready to go.

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  • Spring frost risk and seeding date

    Seeding date

    Average last day for a 0°C frost in Saskatchewan. CLICK TO ENLARGE

    Seeding date decisions are often driven more by historical frost risk than present conditions. That is why many growers will not seed canola before May 1, even if their area had what seemed like favourable seeding conditions in April. Historical frost risk can be interpreted differently based on the crop’s frost tolerance and the grower’s appetite for risk.

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  • PODCAST: Spring frost risk and seeding date

    Seeding date

    Ralph Wright, who leads the agro-meteorology division with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, joins Canola Council of Canada agronomy specialist Autumn Barnes and host Jay Whetter in a discussion about frost risk and canola seeding dates. While the discussion focuses on Southern Alberta, growers and agronomists in all regions will learn from the discussion about frost […]

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  • Pros and cons of early seeding

    Seeding date

    If you have perfect seeding conditions in late April, should you seed canola? Early seeding usually improves canola yield potential and quality, but these benefits depend on survival of a sufficient plant population — ideally 7 to 10 plants per square foot, and a minimum of 4 to 5. An early-seeded crop that is thin […]

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  • How early is too early to seed?

    Seeding date

    This graph from Alberta Agriculture and Food shows that in dry years (1999-2001), canola seeded in late April in the brown soil zone outyielded canola seeded in May.

    Southern Alberta and southwest Saskatchewan may have soil temperatures adequate for canola establishment and just enough moisture for emergence, but should they seed now?

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