Insects

  • Cutworms: Timely scouting and spray decisions

    Insects

    A long relatively dry fall can also allow for maximum egg laying opportunities, and may result in a more widespread outbreak the following year. Dry springs can also improve survival of larvae.

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  • Canola Watch quiz – Cutworm theme

    Insects

    13 questions on cutworms. Test your knowledge.

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  • Insect update: Little red bugs, CSPW, ‘hoppers

    Insects

    Reports of the ‘little red bugs’ increased in 2018 and it’s back again in 2019. The insect is a true bug, Peritrechus convivus, and these and other closely related insects are commonly referred to as ‘dirt-coloured seed bugs’

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  • Insect update: Cutworms, flea beetles, grasshoppers

    Insects

    Keeping scouting for insects, especially in crops that are slow to get going.

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  • Flea beetles: Why do they seem worse?

    Insects

    The flea beetle situation seems worse than usual. The simplest reason seems the most logical: Warm and dry weather favours flea beetle emergence and activity. The same dry weather slows crop growth, leaving plants at a vulnerable small size for longer.

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  • Patches of missing plants could be cutworms, drought or something else

    Insects

    Patches of missing plants will prompt farmers and agronomists to start scouting for cutworms. This scouting step is important because other factors, including dry seedbed conditions and others, can also cause patchy growth. You need to identify the cause so you make accurate action decisions.

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  • Insect update: Flea beetle scouting, cutworm vs wireworm, DBM monitoring

    Insects

    Cutworms or wireworms? Check bare patches, and especially the interface between healthy seedlings and dead patches, to confirm the reason for missing plants. It could be cutworms, wireworms, disease or something else entirely

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  • Make the right flea beetle spray decision: 8 steps

    Insects

    While only a small percentage of canola fields tend to require foliar insecticides to manage flea beetles in addition to seed treatment, all fields should be monitored to assess the potential threat. Begin monitoring right after emergence and through until at least the four-leaf stage.

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  • The scouting toolkit

    Insects

    Smart phones and mobility-enabled tablets could be the most valuable scouting tools. But what else should be in your canola scouting kit?

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  • In-crop insect surveys in 2019

    Insects

    Insect risk maps depend on lots of scouting and survey. Each year, entomologists from the Ministries of Agriculture and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Research Centres collaborate with extension agrologists, crop specialists and industry groups to conduct insect pest surveys in field crops throughout the Prairies.

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  • PPMN canola insect scouting chart

    Insects

    Insects to watch for before and during seeding and immediately after emergence are cutworms, flea beetles, leafhoppers and diamondback moth.

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  • Take part in crowd-sourced insect reporting

    Insects

    Think how on the ball we could be with insect management if everyone shared their scouting results? We could see hot spots flare up early in very localized areas, providing a highly valuable alert to farmers within and beside those areas. Provincial entomologists tracking insect outbreaks would welcome your input.

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  • Late-season insects and pre-harvest intervals

    Insects

    We had reports this week of bertha armyworm at higher numbers (maybe not at thresholds) in some very localized areas, lygus (it’s getting late), flea beetles (don’t spray them, it won’t help for next spring) and aphids (probably don’t spray them either). While doing a pre-harvest scouting for disease, take a look at the insect […]

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  • Canola Watch quiz – Worm ID

    Insects

    How are your worm ID skills? Take the quiz and try to identify the four worms – two familiar, two not so much.

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  • Lygus: Scouting, thresholds and timing

    Insects

    Scout lygus at late flowering and podding stages using a standard insect net of 38 cm (15″) diameter. Take ten 180° sweeps, and aim to sweep the flowers and pods while moving forward. Count the number of lygus in the net.

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