Clubroot

  • Quiz – Clubroot/not clubroot

    Clubroot

    Through the pod filling time between flowering and harvest, growers and agronomists will want to take time for a more intense session of clubroot scouting. But what are you looking for? This quiz will help train your eye.

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  • Scouting for clubroot: How and why now?

    Clubroot

    Vigilantly scout all canola fields for symptoms, even if growing a clubroot resistant (CR) variety. Clubroot galls can start to form about three weeks after emergence, but typically it takes about six to eight weeks for visible galls to form in fields. So galls – if present – will be visible by this stage of the season.

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  • Scouting for clubroot: Why now?

    Clubroot

    One reason… If clubroot is found, you have time to take some focused action on these areas. If the patch is small enough, pull up all the plants that have galls, then cut off the galls and dispose of them.

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  • Give the plants a mid-season root check

    Clubroot

    While scouting canola fields at flowering and podding stages, dig up a few plants in each field and look at the crown and primary root. If the crop has above-ground symptoms, compare the roots of healthy and unhealthy plants. That might help you discover the problem.

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  • PODCAST: Make a plan for clubroot cleaning

    Clubroot

    How is clubroot sanitation like exercise? You don’t do it unless you have a plan. In this podcast, Mike Harding, plant pathology research scientist with Alberta Agriculture and Food, Barb Ziesman, provincial plant disease specialist with Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture, and Dan Orchard, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada, explain the three levels of clean, and the situations for each.

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  • VIDEO: Disinfectants for scouting kit

    Clubroot

    A disinfect like bleach or SprayNine is an essential part of the scouting kit. These will disinfect tools and boots between fields.

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  • Fix field access points to improve clubroot biosecurity

    Clubroot

    One plan for 2020 could be to identify exits for each field and then buy seed to grass in those entrances and exits, providing an extra level of clubroot biosecurity.

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  • Seed decisions: What clubroot-resistance to choose?

    Clubroot

    CR seed is recommended. So the real decision is whether to use CR varieties with the base (Mendel or first generation) resistance trait or use CR varieties with second generation traits.

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  • How to test soil for clubroot

    Clubroot

    Fall is a good time to collect soil for a clubroot DNA test. Information can be used to help with seed and disease management decisions.

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  • Canola Watch quiz – Clubroot VIDEO

    Clubroot

    This week’s quiz is based on information in this video, “Clubroot in Canola”

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  • Clubroot Update (with recipe for clubroot management)

    Clubroot

    Manitoba Agriculture announced this week it has discovered a clubroot pathotype in South Central Manitoba that is able to overcome the first generation clubroot resistance. The article includes a ‘recipe’ to help growers limit clubroot damage in canola.

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  • How to manage (contain) a patch of clubroot

    Clubroot

    If you find a patch of canola plants with clubroot galls, take action now to contain it. This is especially important (1) if clubroot is new to the farm or (2) if the field is seeded to a clubroot-resistant (CR) variety and the patch could have a new pathotype that you need to contain.

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  • New clubroot areas – Scout your CR canola

    Clubroot

    Clubroot continues to be confirmed in new areas. Random scouting of healthy looking plants is important because by the time galls are big enough to cause above-ground symptoms, clubroot has taken a firm hold in the field.

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  • Patch management for clubroot: You can do it! Here’s how

    Clubroot

    If you find a patch of canola plants with clubroot galls, take action now to contain it. This is especially important (1) if clubroot is new to the farm or (2) if the field is seeded to a clubroot-resistant (CR) variety and the patch could have a new pathotype that you need to contain.

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  • How to test soil for clubroot

    Clubroot

    To check fields for the presence of clubroot DNA before you see visual symptoms, you can try a random soil test.

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