Storage tips

  • Warm days allow for natural air drying

    Storage tips

    Still have tough canola in the bin? Warm air has good capacity to dry. For example, at 22°C and 60% relative humidity, canola will trend towards just below 8% moisture content with natural air drying. Therefore, these warm days are ideal for natural air drying.

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  • Canola stored tough is still not dry

    Storage tips

    Even the recent three or four days with highs near 20°C might not have been enough to completely dry the grain, and now cooler weather is coming. What to do?

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  • PODCAST: Timely storage tips

    Storage tips

    Part 1: What to do about high-moisture canola as spring temperatures warm up?
    Part 2: What is the best on-farm system to dry grain?

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  • Spring drying tips for high-moisture canola

    Storage tips

    Farmers with high-moisture canola will need a plan to protect that canola – and turning on the fans without adding heat to the air might not be the best approach. This time of year, most days are poor drying days. When air is not warm enough to actually do any drying, then you’re just warming up the bulk enough to give a head start to the microbial processes that lead to spoilage.

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  • Spring drying tips for high-moisture canola

    Storage tips

    “There is a lot of high-moisture canola on farms this spring and most of it will have to be managed before delivery,” says Angela Brackenreed, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada. She says farmers probably shouldn’t rely on being able to deliver high-moisture canola to elevators in time to reduce the risk.

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  • Bins are excellent marketing tools…as long as canola is safe

    Storage tips

    On-farm storage capacity allows farmers to sit on more of their grain and wait for better market prices, but this advantage falls apart if the crop spoils in the meantime. The best thing is to check all bins.

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  • Is your stored canola OK?

    Storage tips

    Reports of heated canola have trickled through all winter. High moisture seed and dockage, as well as green seed can increase the storage risk for canola. Please check bins. If they are at risk, farmers can take advantage of colder days to aerate or turn the bins by removing a few loads and putting them back on top.

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  • “Damp” canola may not be safe, even if cold

    Storage tips

    Freezing tough or damp canola by running cold air through the bin can be a short-term storage solution for canola that couldn’t get dried before winter…but check that canola regularly. This is not as safe as you might think.

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  • Green seed – Common questions

    Storage tips

    Answers for: What causes high green? Why is green seed a problem for processors? Why does green increase storage risk? And more

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  • Bin sensor shows rising temperature. What to do?

    Storage tips

    ANY unexpected rise in temperature should be a clear signal that action is required. Once an area starts to warm up, the reaction has started and the canola will probably just get hotter and hotter until spoilage starts. Then spoilage will spread until the whole bin is damaged.

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  • Bin safety tips: Stay out

    Storage tips

    High moisture harvest means steady action around the bins – with oversight of dryers, aeration fans, latches, hatches, augers and trucks. The best advice is to stay out of the bins entirely and keeps all guards and shields in place – just in case.

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  • Tips for drying tough and damp canola

    Storage tips

    The ideal goal for safe long-term storage is to have canola rest in the bin at 8% moisture and less than 15°C. All canola should be conditioned after it goes into the bin. For tough and damp canola, the spoilage risk is much higher. Here are some tips to manage that tough or damp canola.

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  • Factors that elevate storage risk

    Storage tips

    Moisture creates a more hospitable environment for moulds that trigger heating. Clumping is a sign of mould growth. Storage research found that canola seeds at 25°C and 10.6% moisture clumped together after 11 days and visible mould colonies appeared after 21 days.

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  • Timely storage tips

    Storage tips

    Tips for…Identifying storage risks, Drying tough and damp canola, Aeration in large bins.

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  • Storage risks: Canola binned hot

    Storage tips

    With a couple of surprisingly hot days, canola harvested in those conditions may have gone into the bin at a high-risk temperature.

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