Plant establishment

  • Consider yield and profit when choosing a seeding rate

    Plant establishment

    A target of five to eight plants per square foot allows for the loss of a couple of plants to frost, insects or other establishment threats while maintaining yield potential. This seeding rate is extra insurance to reduce risk. This target density range is also wide enough to allow for some uncertainty due to emergence percentage and seed size variations within a seed lot. Here are the economic considerations for five to eight versus two to three plants per square foot…

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  • Sentinel story: Plant count case study

    Plant establishment

    By Ian Epp Plants are fully emerged, making it a great time to take a look at canola plant stand and decide if you’re feeling satisfied or disappointed. The first herbicide application is a great way to extensively “scout” fields from the sprayer, but trying to scan plants as they pass under the sprayer just […]

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  • Will this plant live?

    Plant establishment

    A field has a large number of young canola plants that look limp, pale, chewed-up, knocked around, lifeless and sad. How can you tell if a dead-looking plant still has life? Look at the growing point. Is it green?

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  • Herbicide carryover, sprayer contamination or something else entirely?

    Plant establishment

    Injury from herbicide residue in the soil can only occur in fields with a history of Group 2, 4, 5 and 14 herbicide applications. While soil characteristics and dry conditions can extend the at-risk period for these herbicides, carryover issues often occur when required recropping intervals are not followed. For example, Roundup Ready or Liberty Link canola cannot be seeded on fields that had Group 2 imazethapyr (Pursuit, Odyssey) the previous season. Here are typical symptoms for canola damaged by herbicide residue from these 4 groups…

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  • Scouting 7 to 21 days after seeding: What to look for?

    Plant establishment

    With warm soils, decent moisture and 1” seeding depth, emergence can occur about a week after seeding. If emergence is slow or patchy, scout to find out why. The first 21 days are critical to a successful canola crop.

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  • Flea beetles: Why are some fields so bad in 2018?

    Plant establishment

    Early-seeded and slow-growing canola crops (usually due to dry conditions) have faced more flea beetle pressure this year, particularly in Manitoba and central Alberta. Flea beetle emergence tended to occur before most canola crops had emerged, so flea beetles concentrated on the earliest fields. And because topsoil moisture levels were fairly low, these canola plants were growing very slowly. Concentrated feeding and the plant’s inability to out-grow this feeding meant many crops were sprayed.

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  • Calculate seed survival

    Plant establishment

    As part of early-season scouting, assess plant density and percent emergence using the Canola Calculator plant survival calculator.

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  • Start scouting the week after seeding

    Plant establishment

    Start scouting around the time when emergence should occur. Normally by late May, warm soils, decent moisture and 1” seeding depth should produce emergence be about a week after seeding. However, dry conditions can delay emergence.

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  • Reseeding and dry conditions

    Plant establishment

    Wind losses, intense flea beetle feeding and slow emergence – each made worse by dry conditions – have some farmers wondering about reseeding. Keeping a thin stand is often the better option, but this article will help with the decision.

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  • How deep is too deep to seed canola?

    Plant establishment

    1.5” may be as deep as you want to go. If moisture is at 3”, for example, that is a long way for a small canola seedling to stretch.

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