Micronutrients

  • Boron and other micronutrients: Economic results are rare

    Micronutrients

    When well-designed research studies are done for micronutrients in canola, results show little if any economic benefit.

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  • Boron — Understanding the soil test

    Micronutrients

    Figure 5. Relative yield of canola in relation to HW boron levels in the 0-15 cm depth at 18 sites from the preliminary survey-type research and 19 research sites carried out across Western Canada.

    One challenge with boron is the hot water extraction (HW) soil test commonly used to test boron levels does not seem to be a reliable indicator of available boron. A 1999 study by Rigas Karamanos showed no relation between HW boron levels and canola yield, as the graph shows. Yet soil analysis continues to use the HW test for boron.

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  • Scout for nutrient deficiency

    Micronutrients

    This diagram from IPNI shows where deficiency symptoms are likely to show up on a plant. Nitrogen is mobile so with N shortage, plants will move N to new parts of the plant. Therefore deficiency will show up first in older leaves.

    This diagram from IPNI shows where deficiency symptoms are likely to show up on a plant. Nitrogen is mobile, so with an N shortage, plants will move N to new parts of the plant. Therefore deficiency will show up first in older leaves.

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  • UCC: Looking for growers for boron trial

    Micronutrients

    As part of UCC 2015, the CCC agronomy team is looking for 12-15 growers from across the Prairies to test boron in field-scale trials in 2015.

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  • Nutrient essentials: Boron

    Micronutrients

    Interveinal chlorosis is typical of boron deficiency.

    Canola needs a little bit of boron, and most Canadian Prairie soils have enough to meet this demand.

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  • Buyer beware with novel fertilizer products

    Micronutrients

    If a grower decides to try something new, find a uniform field, try one product at a time and leave an untreated check, ensuring both treated and untreated areas are accurately measured for final yield and grade so a true economic comparison can be made. In reality, some products may provide a good payoff for the price, but that payoff may only materialize one year in 4. A few years of trials may be required to get a true picture of the economics before making a final decision. Check out these strip trial tips for more insights on how to get the best possible information from your own on farm research.

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