Insects

  • Insect update: Bertha, diamondback and weevil counts

    Insects

    Insect trap counts are generally low across the Prairies, but bertha counts keep rising. Here are the latest provincial survey results.

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  • Diamondback moth parasitoid in high numbers

    Insects

    Entomologists were excited to find a known diamondback moth parasitoid, the 2mm-long Diolcogaster claritibia wasp, at very high numbers in Alberta canola fields over the past couple of weeks.

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  • Map of the Week – Cabbage seedpod weevil counts

    Insects

    Alberta Agriculture’s cabbage seedpod weevil survey results for 2018 are mapped. In areas with a red marker, 25% or more of samples reported are above the threshold.

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  • Lygus bugs: Thresholds and scouting tips

    Insects

    Lygus. Credit: Dan Johnson

    In very dry conditions: Threshold tables for lygus indicate that if canola is $12 per bushel and spray costs $8 per acre, the threshold at the early pod stage is 5 lygus adults or late instar nymphs per 10 sweeps (0.5 per sweep).

    In moist and high-yield conditions: The economic threshold is quite a bit higher. At early pod stage, 50 lygus per 10 sweeps (5 per sweep) could cause a 2 bu./ac. reduction in yield — which could be a more suitable economic threshold in this situation. At late pod stage (the last week or so before cutting), pods are too tough to penetrate.

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  • Insect update: The biggies plus clover cutworms and little red bugs

    Insects

    Clover cutworm damage has been confirmed in a few fields around Weyburn, Saskatchewan. They are a climbing cutworm and can be easily confused with bertha armyworm. The most distinct difference between the two species is the wide stripe along each side; it is yellowish pink on clover cutworm and yellowish orange on bertha armyworm.

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  • Cutworms heavy in canola on canola

    Insects

    Two CCC agronomy specialists heard this week of high cutworm damage in canola fields seeded into canola stubble. Canola on canola has many potential yield risks and we can add heavy cutworm feeding to that list.

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  • Map of the Week – CSPW

    Insects

    With earliest canola fields starting to flower in southern Alberta and southwest Saskatchewan, cabbage seedpod weevil scouting season begins. Here is the forecast map for 2018 based on 2017 surveys.

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  • Cabbage seedpod weevil: Early fields at highest risk

    Insects

    Earliest canola fields are just coming into flower in southern Alberta and southwest Saskatchewan, the highest-risk areas for cabbage seedpod weevil in Western Canada. Cabbage seedpod weevils tend to cluster in fields that are first to flower, so farmers with early fields will want to check them closely.

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  • Map of the Week – Bertha armyworm

    Insects

    Growing degree days across most of the Prairies have reached the threshold for adult bertha armyworm (moth) emergence from overwintering pupae. That is 7-10 days ahead of normal. Egg laying begins shortly after adult emergence and young worms emerge about a week after that. Based on 2017 results, 2018 is not expected to be a bad year, but local flare-ups can occur.

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  • Scouting 7 to 21 days after seeding: What to look for?

    Insects

    With warm soils, decent moisture and 1” seeding depth, emergence can occur about a week after seeding. If emergence is slow or patchy, scout to find out why. The first 21 days are critical to a successful canola crop.

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Canola Watch