Insects-general-other

  • Late-season insects and pre-harvest intervals

    Insects-general-other

    We had reports this week of bertha armyworm at higher numbers (maybe not at thresholds) in some very localized areas, lygus (it’s getting late), flea beetles (don’t spray them, it won’t help for next spring) and aphids (probably don’t spray them either). While doing a pre-harvest scouting for disease, take a look at the insect […]

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  • Photography tips for agronomy

    Insects-general-other

    Mystery damage to top of leaf.

    Photographs can be a valuable diagnostic tool, but they have to be in focus, taken from various angles and come with details on field conditions and location.

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  • Tank mixes of herbicides and insecticides or fungicides

    Insects-general-other

    Sprayer in canola Cheri Jacobsen small

    Combining pest control operations to save trips over the field may seem like good economic sense, but consider the following when making this decision:

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  • What’s the Buff? Don’t spray sensitive areas

    Insects-general-other

    Buffer zones or strips come in all shapes and sizes, and are designed to protect sensitive areas. Sensitive areas include permanent vegetation to maintain good water quality (riparian areas around rivers, lakes and ponds), control erosion (shelterbelts) or provide wildlife habitat. These areas are also typically habitat for pollinators and other beneficial insects.

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  • Map of the Week – wind trajectories

    Insects-general-other

    Of particular interest are those trajectories that, prior to their arrival in Canada, originated over northwestern and southern USA and Mexico – anywhere diamondback moth populations overwinter and adults are actively migrating.

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  • Help with insect surveys for 2018

    Insects-general-other

    Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba will be doing bertha armyworm and diamondback moth surveys again in 2018. To put up a trap and help with the monitoring program (including trap checking), please contact your provincial entomologist:

    Alberta: Email Shelley Barkley at Shelley.Barkley@gov.ab.ca or Scott Meers at Scott.Meers@gov.ab.ca
    Saskatchewan: Email James Tansey at james.tansey@gov.sk.ca.
    Manitoba: Email John Gavloski at john.Gavloski@gov.mb.ca.

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  • Insect distribution maps for 2017 and forecast maps for 2018

    Insects-general-other

    Prairie Pest Monitoring Network (PPMN) regional maps for insect pests affecting canola are provided in this article.

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  • Visit fieldheroes.ca to learn more about beneficials

    Insects-general-other

    The Field Heroes website shows how natural enemies can help manage insect pest populations. Scouting is still necessary because beneficial insects do not always keep pest damage below economic levels, but spraying without consideration for economic thresholds can hurt the farm bottomline and also cause unnecessary damage to these beneficial insects.

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  • Seed treatment upgrades diversify insect protection

    Insects-general-other

    With each canola seed decision, growers face this question: Would a seed treatment upgrade to improve management of flea beetles and cutworms provide a return on investment? A review of flea beetle and cutworm scouting notes from the past few years will help with this decision.

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  • Insect update: What to look for right now?

    Insects-general-other

    While some areas are reporting higher numbers of diamondback moth larvae (shown above), it takes 100-150 larvae per square metre in immature to flowering plants or 200 to 300 larvae per square metre in plants with flowers and pods to cause enough damage to warrant a spray. Natural controls, including beneficial insects, tend to keep numbers below thresholds.

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