In-crop

  • Spray early: Economics of early weed control

    In-crop

    One of our Alberta agronomy specialists encountered the situation in the photo. Canola emergence was patchy in this small area, but generally good overall. The bigger issue was the big population of tiny weeds. The agronomy specialist wondered if these buckwheat seedlings, though very abundant, were too small to spray? The answer is no.

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  • In-crop herbicide timing – scenarios

    In-crop

    In general, early weed control is best. A few early weeds emerging before or at the same time as canola plants are much more damaging to yield than lots of weeds emerging after canola plants are established. Those early-emerging weeds tie up nutrients and moisture valuable to the crop and can also out-compete the crop […]

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  • Second herbicide application: A scenario

    In-crop

    A Canola Watch reader sent us this question: I have wild buckwheat at the 3- to 4-leaf stage that somehow got missed with the first application of Liberty 10 days ago . It’s moderate in severity. Will it cause me grief at swath timing? And or will it have any effect on yield? Crop stage is 6-leaf or so.

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  • Late herbicide: Is it worth it?

    In-crop

    Wind and wet pushed back a lot of weed management and some fields are still not sprayed. In this situation, intense weed pressure can reduce yields by 20%, 30%, 50%… That’s why early weed control has a huge positive effect on profitability, but late control is better than nothing. Late control can stop the yield loss, stop weeds from contributing substantially to the weed seed bank, and improve crop harvestability.

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  • Is a second herbicide application necessary?

    In-crop

    A second in-crop spray only makes sense if…

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  • Herbicide Qs on tank mixing, ideal weather, spray patterns and more

    In-crop

    Here are some agronomy-related questions that dig a little deeper into herbicide performance in canola….

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  • Cleavers: In-crop control

    In-crop

    For in-crop management of cleavers in canola, both glyphosate and glufosinate work best on smaller spring-germinating plants. Early herbicide application is also best for crop yield. Use a rate and water volume suitable for cleavers.

    Find details in the provincial crop protection guides: crop protection for your province: Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba

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  • Early weeds: Scout then spray

    In-crop

    The Canola Council of Canada agronomy team looked at this photo above and discussed whether the field should be sprayed now or in a few days after more weeds have emerged. Consensus was that the field could have been sprayed a few days earlier. Angela Brackenreed, who scouted the field, says the weeds just became visible in the past three days, so the crop is actually well ahead of them. She confirmed that the grower plans to spray today as long as conditions allow.

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  • Strive for early weed control

    In-crop

    Early weeds have large impact on canola yield potential. Research has shown a yield advantage of 3 bu./ac. when weeds are removed at the 1- to 2-leaf stage of canola instead of waiting until the 3- to 4-leaf stage. That advantage rises to 7 bu./ac. when comparing weed control at the 1- to 2-leaf stage versus the 6- to 7-leaf stage.

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  • Keep It Clean: Rates and options for each HT system

    In-crop

    A key part of the Keep It Clean program is to follow label rates and timing for all crop protection products. Here are specifics for each herbicide-tolerant system.

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  • Check suspicious weeds for herbicide resistance

    In-crop

    Kochia stands above the canola canopy. You might want to check them for glyphosate resistance. Source: Ian Epp

    Surviving weeds are growing strong and some of them — like kochia and wild oats — start to look really obvious by this time of year.

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  • Herbicide issues: Late spraying, drift, carryover

    In-crop

    Second applications applied late can reduce profitability it two ways: A competitive crop growing ahead of the weeds may not need a second application. A late application can cause a surprising level of hidden damage to canola plants, setting back yield potential.

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  • Weed competition: The second application

    In-crop

    Some canola fields face intense competition from grassy weeds this year.

    Growers who usually spray twice may not need that second pass this year if the canopy has closed, weeds are behind the crop, and the recommended application window is past. A second application only makes sense when….

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  • Late herbicide: Make a balanced decision

    In-crop

    Spraying late or at higher-than-label rates can reduce canola profits.

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  • Strategies to improve weed control in canola

    In-crop

    This article includes tips on how to control Canada thistle in canola. Credit: Nicole Philp

    This article describes specific tips for timing and rates for each canola herbicide-tolerant (HT) system.

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