Diseases-general-other

  • Hail on flowering canola

    Diseases-general-other

    Hail damage at mid to late flower can result in high yield losses. If trying a rescue treatment, check that there is leaf area to take up the treatment, and that the crop has any chance of recovery.

    The later hail occurs in the season, the more damage it can do to yield. That said, flowering canola can, with enough time, recover from hail that knocks off a large percentage of flowers.

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  • Novel products: Run your own tests

    Diseases-general-other

    Rescue treatments for hail, excess moisture and other stress factors are rarely tested in broad scientific studies. Growers considering these treatments have to remember the decision comes down to “buyer beware”.

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  • Use rain delays to check disease levels

    Diseases-general-other

    Clippers for cutting stems to check for blackleg.

    Crop rotation and seed decisions are improved when growers and agronomists have a good handle on the disease situation. Blackleg levels were higher than expected in some areas this year, and clubroot continues to spread. Knowledge of the incidence and severity of these two diseases provides an important head start in keeping them under control.

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  • Verticillium wilt and other unusual sightings

    Diseases-general-other

    Verticillium wilt in canola. Credit: MAFRD

    Verticillium wilt was found in a canola field in Manitoba in 2014, and a survey of approximately 1,000 fields across Canada is underway this summer and fall.

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  • Top 10 things to scout after swathing two rounds

    Diseases-general-other

    With a low plant population, canola will grow bigger with more branches.

    Tangled mature canola fields can be hard to scout. Swathing two full rounds before scouting makes it much easier to quickly check a number of plants in a few areas — including the back of the field. Here are things to look for….

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  • Crop protection products and international markets: What you need to know

    Diseases-general-other

    When it comes to maintaining Canada’s reputation as a high quality canola supplier, everyone in the canola value chain has an important role to play.

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  • Keep it Clean: PHI and storage tips

    Diseases-general-other

    When spraying, stick to the pre-harvest interval unique to each product. When prepping bins, follow canola storage recommendations….

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  • Keep it Clean, keep the customer happy

    Diseases-general-other

    Canada exports 90% of the canola we produce, and our global customers won’t accept anything less than squeaky-clean seed. This time of year, the keys are to ensure a crop protection product applied won’t cause concern for canola exporters, and to know a product’s required interval between application and swathing.

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  • Spraying a multi-staged crop

    Diseases-general-other

    Many canola crops have plants at multiple stages of growth. This field was reseeded due to frost, but some of the originals survived.

    Crop staging comes into play for herbicide, insecticide and fungicide timing. So crops with plants at various stages — some at flowering, some barely at the bud stage, for example — present a challenge when deciding when to spray.

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  • Rotations and risk management

    Diseases-general-other

    Blackleg disease rating: 2

    Scientific research in Western Canada has identified three factors that increase the risk of canola yield loss in short rotations. They are blackleg (shown above), clubroot and cabbage root maggot.

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  • Leave required time between spraying and cutting

    Diseases-general-other

    spraytoswathscreenshots

    Pre-harvest interval (PHI) refers to the amount of time that must lapse (in days) after a pesticide application before the crop is cut. Cutting refers to swathing or straight combining. Each crop protection product has its own PHI, and the PHI for a specific product often vary by crop.

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  • Disease diagnostics

    Diseases-general-other

    cw2-image-diseases-blackleg-field-lodging-severe-1-hammondd

    Seeing signs of canola disease but you don’t know what it is?

    Read this article: Disease to look for while harvest scouting.
    Watch this video: CCC pre-swath disease scouting video.
    Use the Canola Diagnostic Tool

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  • Video: Begin your pre-harvest disease watch

    Diseases-general-other

    Pre-swath disease scouting

    Yield-robbing levels of disease will be easy to spot in canola fields now and through to harvest. This is a great time to start your pre-harvest disease scouting. The CCC has released a new pre-swath disease scouting video available on www.canolacouncil.org on proper identification including tips and close up views of typical damage from the major diseases.

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  • Trying a new treatment? Leave a test strip

    Diseases-general-other

    Want to see how a foliar nutrient application helps a hailed crop? Leave a check strip. Want to see whether a novel treatment provided a return on investment? Leave a check strip.

    Growers can use strip trials on their own farms to test how a particular practice or product performs in a local environment. This information can then be used to help decide whether it may be worthwhile to try this new practice or product on a larger proportion of the farm, and to target it at acres with the greatest likelihood of success.

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  • How do new pathotypes develop?

    Diseases-general-other

    Roughly one tonne of soil — 1,000,000 grams. Soil that is lightly infested with clubroot has a low chance of selecting for a pathotype that could be virulent on clubroot-resistant canola.

    Resistance can lose its effectiveness when repeated cropping of a resistance source selects for individuals within a pathogen population that are virulent on that resistance. Initially, these new pathogen strains are very rare but then increase by being able to attack the “resistant” genotypes.

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