Diamondback moth

  • Three insects to look for on canola pods

    Diamondback moth

    The three most common pod munchers are bertha armyworm, diamondback moth larvae and lygus bugs. Hot spots can sometimes be isolated to specific fields, so check each field. Before spraying, make sure insects counts are at or above economic thresholds. Applications made when insect numbers are below thresholds will not provide a positive return on investment and can do unnecessary harm to the many beneficial insects that help keep pest insect populations low.

    READ MORE

  • Diamondback moth larvae observed

    Diamondback moth

    Diamondback moth larvae are at noticeable levels in many canola fields in the Eastern and southern Interlake areas of Manitoba. But levels are generally below the economic threshold.

    READ MORE

  • Insect update: Bertha, diamondback and weevil counts

    Diamondback moth

    Insect trap counts are generally low across the Prairies, but bertha counts keep rising. Here are the latest provincial survey results.

    READ MORE

  • Map of the Week – wind trajectories

    Diamondback moth

    Of particular interest are those trajectories that, prior to their arrival in Canada, originated over northwestern and southern USA and Mexico – anywhere diamondback moth populations overwinter and adults are actively migrating.

    READ MORE

  • Canola Watch quiz: Diamondback moth

    Diamondback moth

    Test your diamondback management skills with these four questions…

    READ MORE

  • Diamondback moth larvae: Common questions

    Diamondback moth

    Diamondback moth larvae have been found in canola fields across the Prairies this year. Of those fields with the larvae, counts in many (perhaps most) are below and often well below thresholds. Some fields are at thresholds. Some fields seem to be well above thresholds. The key is to the check each field. Diamondback larvae can vary in number from field to field and even within areas of a field. (Photo credit: John Gavloski)

    Here are answers to common questions….

    READ MORE

  • Keep watch for diamondback moth larvae

    Diamondback moth

    Diamondback moth larvae have been found in many fields this year. In most cases counts have been well below economic thresholds, but keep looking just in case. Some fields are at thresholds and a few have been sprayed.

    READ MORE

  • Insects: Cutworm guide, DBM monitoring

    Diamondback moth

    AAFC has published a new cutworm guide, available as a free download, with descriptions of all pest cutworms in Canada as well as helpful management tips, including this excerpt from the scouting section….

    READ MORE

  • Why so few insects this year?

    Diamondback moth

    Pod-eating insects — including bertha armyworm, lygus and diamondback moth larvae — are at low levels in general in 2016. The biggest factors regulating insect populations are (1) weather, (2) natural enemies and (3) competing food sources. Each is working in favour of lower insect pest pressure this year.

    READ MORE

  • Diamondback moth larvae — Thresholds

    Diamondback moth

    Diamondback moth larvae feeding on pods.

    Thresholds for diamondback moth larvae are 100-150 larvae per square metre in immature to flowering plants and 200-300 larvae per square metre (20-30 per square foot) in plants with flowers and pods.

    READ MORE

Canola Watch