Cutworm

  • What’s going on with the roots?

    Cutworm

    Take a random look at a few canola roots in each field to see what’s going on. Also dig up the root area for plants that look less than healthy for no apparent reason. This plant has foot rot.

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  • Cutworms heavy in canola on canola

    Cutworm

    Two CCC agronomy specialists heard this week of high cutworm damage in canola fields seeded into canola stubble. Canola on canola has many potential yield risks and we can add heavy cutworm feeding to that list.

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  • Cutworms: Timely scouting and spray decisions

    Cutworm

    Include cutworms on the scouting checklist for the first one to three weeks after emergence. Any later and management becomes more difficult because (i) spraying a registered insecticide is useless because the cutworms have developed beyond the feeding stage, and/or (ii) reseeding options are starting to be limited.

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  • Timely cutworm scouting and spray decisions

    Cutworm

    See bare patches like this? Could be cutworms. Include cutworms on the scouting checklist for the first one to three weeks after emergence. Any later and management becomes more difficult because (i) spraying a registered insecticide is useless because the cutworms have developed beyond the feeding stage, and/or (ii) reseeding options are starting to be limited.

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  • Canola Watch quiz – Cutworm

    Cutworm

    Test your cutworm knowledge with these four questions, including a “dry soils” angle.

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  • Blackleg, foot rot or cutworms?

    Cutworm

    These can be hard to tell apart sometimes. Pinched or otherwise damaged-looking stems can occur with all three. The photo shows blackleg infection. Here’s how to tell them apart…

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  • Canola Watch quiz: Cutworms

    Cutworm

    Test your cutworm knowledge. Answers to these five questions are found in the new guide, “Cutworm Pests of Crops in Western Canada” from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

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  • Timely cutworm scouting and spray decisions

    Cutworm

    Why scout? Reason one: To confirm that cutworms are the cause. For example, fungal seedling diseases can cause seed and seedling decay that can lead to patches of missing plants Reason two: To identify the cutworm species present as this can influence management decisions. Underground-feeding cutworms are less likely to encounter spray, for one thing. And thresholds vary by species.

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  • Insects: Cutworms in some fields

    Cutworm

    Cutworms have been observed in some regions, including the southeast Peace region and west-central Saskatchewan stretching into Alberta. In western Saskatchewan, early observations suggest that cutworms are worse in fields that had lentils last year. In general, fields that had flowering plants (crops or weed patches) in August or September of the previous year may have higher cutworm counts. These flowers attract the adult moths, which lay their eggs in these areas. The nominal threshold for cutworms is 25-30% lost plants in a field or confined area.

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  • Insects: Cutworm guide, DBM monitoring

    Cutworm

    AAFC has published a new cutworm guide, available as a free download, with descriptions of all pest cutworms in Canada as well as helpful management tips, including this excerpt from the scouting section….

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  • Cutworms: Reseeding and the risk period

    Cutworm

    Redbacked cutworm with pupae. If you see a lot of pupae, it may signal the end is near for the cutworm threat.

    Usually by the end of June, most of the cutworms that overwintered as eggs or partly grown larvae (including redbacked, as shown in this John Gavloski photo) have pupated and are no longer a risk to crops. In early and warm springs, cutworms will often pupate earlier in June. In cooler spring, cutworm activity often carries into July before pupation.

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  • Cutworms: The basics

    Cutworm

    Redbacked cutworm.

    Higher than normal cutworm feeding has been reported in some locations. This could be due to various factors, including the long fall, early spring and weed growth to provide food through these times. Here are scouting techniques to follow while inspecting canola fields for cutworms.

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  • Damage ID: Cutworms or seedling diseases?

    Cutworm

    Cutworms clipped this plant. The investigation included digging to discover cutworms present and observation of the plant damage, which looked like biting not rotting.

    Cutworms and seedling diseases are fairly common causes for toppled or missing plants this time of year. Here are a few tips to help you distinguish which is at work….

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  • June 10 Quiz — Cutworms

    Cutworm

    How well can you identify the most common cutworm species found in Canadian canola crops?

    Pale western cutworm (Frank Peairs-bugwood.org) small

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  • Insect update: Cutworms, flea beetles, aster leafhoppers

    Cutworm

    Striped flea beetle on stem. Credit: Deanna McLennan

    Flea beetles remain the single biggest insect threat this week, although pressure seems to be waning. Cutworm losses have been reported in a few fields across the Prairies, but damage is usually patchy within a field and nearby fields might not have any losses. The key with all insects is to scout and count and adhere to economic thresholds for control. Just seeing a few cutworms or grasshoppers or any other pest is not a reason to spray them. Photo credit: Deanna McLennan

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