Cutworm

  • Insect Update: Flea beetle products, diamondback moth numbers

    Cutworm

    Trap counts are showing higher numbers of diamondback moths in a few areas, but this just means that the moths have arrived, and is not necessarily a cause for concern. Flea beetle scouting is more important this week.

    READ MORE

  • Insects watch: Flea beetles, cutworms

    Cutworm

    Cutworm feeding results in notched, wilted, dead or cut-off plants. Patches of missing plants could also be cutworms. Include cutworms on the scouting checklist for the first one to three weeks after emergence.

    READ MORE

  • Insect update: Grasshoppers, DBM, cutworms

    Cutworm

    Grasshoppers are causing some problems this week in areas that remain dry. As for areas that got rain, the rapid crop growth that results should reduce the economic risk from grasshoppers.

    READ MORE

  • Cutworms: Timely scouting and spray decisions

    Cutworm

    A long relatively dry fall can also allow for maximum egg laying opportunities, and may result in a more widespread outbreak the following year. Dry springs can also improve survival of larvae.

    READ MORE

  • Canola Watch quiz – Cutworm theme

    Cutworm

    13 questions on cutworms. Test your knowledge.

    READ MORE

  • Patches of missing plants could be cutworms, drought or something else

    Cutworm

    Patches of missing plants will prompt farmers and agronomists to start scouting for cutworms. This scouting step is important because other factors, including dry seedbed conditions and others, can also cause patchy growth. You need to identify the cause so you make accurate action decisions.

    READ MORE

  • Insect update: Flea beetle scouting, cutworm vs wireworm, DBM monitoring

    Cutworm

    Cutworms or wireworms? Check bare patches, and especially the interface between healthy seedlings and dead patches, to confirm the reason for missing plants. It could be cutworms, wireworms, disease or something else entirely

    READ MORE

  • What’s going on with the roots?

    Cutworm

    Take a random look at a few canola roots in each field to see what’s going on. Also dig up the root area for plants that look less than healthy for no apparent reason. This plant has foot rot.

    READ MORE

  • Cutworms heavy in canola on canola

    Cutworm

    Two CCC agronomy specialists heard this week of high cutworm damage in canola fields seeded into canola stubble. Canola on canola has many potential yield risks and we can add heavy cutworm feeding to that list.

    READ MORE

  • Cutworms: Timely scouting and spray decisions

    Cutworm

    Include cutworms on the scouting checklist for the first one to three weeks after emergence. Any later and management becomes more difficult because (i) spraying a registered insecticide is useless because the cutworms have developed beyond the feeding stage, and/or (ii) reseeding options are starting to be limited.

    READ MORE

  • Timely cutworm scouting and spray decisions

    Cutworm

    See bare patches like this? Could be cutworms. Include cutworms on the scouting checklist for the first one to three weeks after emergence. Any later and management becomes more difficult because (i) spraying a registered insecticide is useless because the cutworms have developed beyond the feeding stage, and/or (ii) reseeding options are starting to be limited.

    READ MORE

  • Canola Watch quiz – Cutworm

    Cutworm

    Test your cutworm knowledge with these four questions, including a “dry soils” angle.

    READ MORE

  • Blackleg, foot rot or cutworms?

    Cutworm

    These can be hard to tell apart sometimes. Pinched or otherwise damaged-looking stems can occur with all three. The photo shows blackleg infection. Here’s how to tell them apart…

    READ MORE

  • Canola Watch quiz: Cutworms

    Cutworm

    Test your cutworm knowledge. Answers to these five questions are found in the new guide, “Cutworm Pests of Crops in Western Canada” from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

    READ MORE

  • Timely cutworm scouting and spray decisions

    Cutworm

    Why scout? Reason one: To confirm that cutworms are the cause. For example, fungal seedling diseases can cause seed and seedling decay that can lead to patches of missing plants Reason two: To identify the cutworm species present as this can influence management decisions. Underground-feeding cutworms are less likely to encounter spray, for one thing. And thresholds vary by species.

    READ MORE

Canola Watch