Bertha armyworm

  • Three insects to look for on canola pods

    Bertha armyworm

    The three most common pod munchers are bertha armyworm, diamondback moth larvae and lygus bugs. Hot spots can sometimes be isolated to specific fields, so check each field. Before spraying, make sure insects counts are at or above economic thresholds. Applications made when insect numbers are below thresholds will not provide a positive return on investment and can do unnecessary harm to the many beneficial insects that help keep pest insect populations low.

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  • Map of the Week – Bertha armyworm counts

    Bertha armyworm

    A few hotspots with higher bertha armyworm moth counts are showing up in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

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  • Bertha armyworm: Thresholds

    Bertha armyworm

    The economic threshold is the density of larvae where the economic value of the yield lost due to feeding equals the cost of control.

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  • Insect update: Bertha, diamondback and weevil counts

    Bertha armyworm

    Insect trap counts are generally low across the Prairies, but bertha counts keep rising. Here are the latest provincial survey results.

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  • Map of the Week – Bertha armyworm

    Bertha armyworm

    Growing degree days across most of the Prairies have reached the threshold for adult bertha armyworm (moth) emergence from overwintering pupae. That is 7-10 days ahead of normal. Egg laying begins shortly after adult emergence and young worms emerge about a week after that. Based on 2017 results, 2018 is not expected to be a bad year, but local flare-ups can occur.

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  • Reader question: Do bertha armyworms in 2017 indicate higher risk for 2018?

    Bertha armyworm

    A reader from southeast of Saskatoon emailed this question: I had a field with bertha armyworms on the perimeter in 2017. Numbers were not quite enough to reach spray thresholds, but very close. (I likely should have sprayed the perimeter.) My plans are to seed the field next to it to canola this year. Will this second field likely have a bertha armyworm issue?

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  • Bertha armyworm: Hot pockets, scouting, rain

    Bertha armyworm

    A heavily-infested field in western Manitoba (south of Riding Mountain National Park) generated a lot of interest on Twitter in the past week. It prompted a lot of scouting, which is good. But what this one field and the ensuing scouting demonstrated is that bertha armyworm population spikes can be highly localized.

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  • Be on alert for bertha armyworms

    Bertha armyworm

    Bertha armyworm adult moth counts were generally low across the Prairies in 2017. A few trap sites did enter the moderate risk level, but none was high. See provincial counts in the Prairie Pest Monitoring Network blog. However, as experienced with diamondback moth trap counts this year, egg survival could be higher in dry conditions and warm weather will promote rapid growth.

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  • Bertha armyworm: A few warm spots

    Bertha armyworm

    Bertha armyworms, various colours. Photo credit: Devin Pendree

    While economic levels of damage have not been reported anywhere yet this year, individual fields could experience isolated high numbers.

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  • Why so few insects this year?

    Bertha armyworm

    Pod-eating insects — including bertha armyworm, lygus and diamondback moth larvae — are at low levels in general in 2016. The biggest factors regulating insect populations are (1) weather, (2) natural enemies and (3) competing food sources. Each is working in favour of lower insect pest pressure this year.

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