Bertha armyworm

  • Bertha armyworm: Time to scout

    Bertha armyworm

    Adult trap counts show a few potential hot spots for larvae feeding, but numbers can be quite different field to field. Check each field!

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  • Bertha armyworm: Updates and scouting tips

    Bertha armyworm

    Even if an area is low risk according to provincial risk maps, local hot spots can flare up – which is why each farm should make its own assessment on a field by field basis.

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  • Pod eaters: Scouting tips and thresholds

    Bertha armyworm

    Check pods for feeding from bertha armyworm, diamondback moth larvae, lygus and other pests. If any pod feeders are found, make accurate counts in at least three locations 50 metres apart in each field. Then make spray decisions based on thresholds.

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  • Bertha spraying and pre-harvest intervals

    Bertha armyworm

    A full-fledged bertha armyworm outbreak continues in the Peace region. Continue scouting, noting that fields at thresholds can be right beside fields with low counts.

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  • Bertha armyworm at thresholds in Peace

    Bertha armyworm

    Bertha armyworm numbers are at thresholds in more Peace-region canola fields this week. Growers in the Birch Hills, Saddle Hills and Northern Sunrise areas in particular are encouraged to scout.

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  • Insect update

    Bertha armyworm

    As predicted by moth traps, the Peace region has fields at thresholds. Beyond there, a few field here and there across the Prairies have been sprayed but the worm is not a problem on most fields.

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  • Look for berthas

    Bertha armyworm

    The bertha armyworm risk is fairly low across most of the Prairies, but the insect pest is at high numbers in localized areas. These infestations can occur even when adult traps in the area had counts within the ‘low’ risk range, so scouting is recommended everywhere.

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  • Canola Watch quiz – bertha armyworm

    Bertha armyworm

    Test your bertha armyworm identification and scouting skills with these 6 questions.

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  • Identify green worms accurately

    Bertha armyworm

    The most damaging of the ‘green’ worms is the bertha armyworm, which can be green, brown or black.

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  • Three insects to look for on canola pods

    Bertha armyworm

    The three most common pod munchers are bertha armyworm, diamondback moth larvae and lygus bugs. Hot spots can sometimes be isolated to specific fields, so check each field. Before spraying, make sure insects counts are at or above economic thresholds. Applications made when insect numbers are below thresholds will not provide a positive return on investment and can do unnecessary harm to the many beneficial insects that help keep pest insect populations low.

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  • Map of the Week – Bertha armyworm counts

    Bertha armyworm

    A few hotspots with higher bertha armyworm moth counts are showing up in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

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  • Bertha armyworm: Thresholds

    Bertha armyworm

    The economic threshold is the density of larvae where the economic value of the yield lost due to feeding equals the cost of control.

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  • Insect update: Bertha, diamondback and weevil counts

    Bertha armyworm

    Insect trap counts are generally low across the Prairies, but bertha counts keep rising. Here are the latest provincial survey results.

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  • Map of the Week – Bertha armyworm

    Bertha armyworm

    Growing degree days across most of the Prairies have reached the threshold for adult bertha armyworm (moth) emergence from overwintering pupae. That is 7-10 days ahead of normal. Egg laying begins shortly after adult emergence and young worms emerge about a week after that. Based on 2017 results, 2018 is not expected to be a bad year, but local flare-ups can occur.

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  • Reader question: Do bertha armyworms in 2017 indicate higher risk for 2018?

    Bertha armyworm

    A reader from southeast of Saskatoon emailed this question: I had a field with bertha armyworms on the perimeter in 2017. Numbers were not quite enough to reach spray thresholds, but very close. (I likely should have sprayed the perimeter.) My plans are to seed the field next to it to canola this year. Will this second field likely have a bertha armyworm issue?

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