Beneficial

  • Diamondback moth parasitoid in high numbers

    Beneficial

    Entomologists were excited to find a known diamondback moth parasitoid, the 2mm-long Diolcogaster claritibia wasp, at very high numbers in Alberta canola fields over the past couple of weeks.

    READ MORE

  • Visit fieldheroes.ca to learn more about beneficials

    Beneficial

    The Field Heroes website shows how natural enemies can help manage insect pest populations. Scouting is still necessary because beneficial insects do not always keep pest damage below economic levels, but spraying without consideration for economic thresholds can hurt the farm bottomline and also cause unnecessary damage to these beneficial insects.

    READ MORE

  • Insect update: Beneficials, CSPW, root maggots

    Beneficial

    Banchus is a parasitoid of bertha armyworm. It can be harmed by unnecessary insecticide sprays. Source: Lloyd Dosdall

    Beneficials. Lygus, bertha armyworm and diamondback moth have a number of natural enemies that will keep populations in check. These beneficial insects may not control an immediate pest threat that has already exceeded thresholds — growers will still have to spray in that case — but beneficials can keep a lid on populations. The key to preserving beneficial insects is to follow thresholds and spray only when necessary. Click here for beneficials to look for while scouting.

    Read more for updates on cabbage seedpod weevil, cabbage root maggot and others….

    READ MORE

  • Bee BMPs

    Beneficial

    Source: John Gavloski, MAFRI

    Here are best management practices to be friendly with bees and beekeepers….

    READ MORE

  • Bees and canola are good for each other

    Beneficial

    Bees are good for canola. Canola is good for bees. Canola flowers provide an important source of nectar for honey producers in Western Canada: 80% of the honey produced in Canada comes from canola flowers. Honey bees and other pollinators can also increase canola yields. Although napus canola is self-pollinating, studies show that the extra level of pollination that bees and other pollinators provide can increase yields. This benefit should be considered when making management decisions in canola that could harm bees.

    READ MORE

  • Beneficials to look for while scouting

    Beneficial

    Lygus, bertha armyworm and diamondback moth have a number of natural enemies that will keep populations in check. These beneficial insects may not control an immediate insect threat — growers will still have to spray if economic thresholds are reached — but beneficials can keep a lid on populations. The key to preserving beneficial insects is to follow thresholds and spray only when necessary. Here are some beneficials to watch for while scouting:

    READ MORE

  • Insect update: diamondback, weevil, cutworm, bertha, beneficials

    Beneficial

    Probably too early to spray cabbage seedpod weevil, diamondback continue feeding, bertha moth numbers are high in some regions, cutworms near the end but still active, and always think about those valuable beneficials — like those helpful killers, the lady bugs.

    READ MORE

Canola Watch