Aster leafhopper

  • Map of the Week – wind trajectories

    Aster leafhopper

    Of particular interest are those trajectories that, prior to their arrival in Canada, originated over northwestern and southern USA and Mexico – anywhere diamondback moth populations overwinter and adults are actively migrating.

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  • Leafhoppers building

    Aster leafhopper

    The aster leafhopper (species Macrosteles quadrilineatus) has 4 distinct black lines on its head. You can see these lines with a magnifying glass.

    Leafhopper populations are building, which could increase the risk for aster yellows. Even so, there is not really a good case for spraying for leafhoppers in canola. Why not?

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  • Aster yellows: No evidence of a problem in 2013

    Aster leafhopper

    Aster leafhopper numbers are quite low so far this year, down considerably from 2012. Aster leafhoppers carry aster yellows phytoplasma, so without leafhoppers to transfer the disease, there is no infection. Based on what we know at this stage, there is no evidence of a significant aster yellows risk for 2013.

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  • South winds arrive

    Aster leafhopper

    South winds from Texas and California/Mexico have reached the Prairies, as the maps show. Winds from the south central U.S. bring aster leafhoppers (which carries aster yellows phytoplasma) and the California winds can bring diamondback moths.

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Canola Watch