September 26, 2018 – Issue 26

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  • Stand establishment focus at Canola Discovery Forum 2018

    Canola Discovery Forum 2018, October 22-23 in Banff, will focus on the major issues that help or hurt canola emergence and seedling survival. You will leave the two-day agronomy seminar with a better understanding of best practices that improve the return on investment for canola seed and overall profitability of the crop.

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  • How to test soils for the clubroot pathogen

    Soil tests for clubroot can have two objectives:
    1. Is the clubroot pathogen present? (Yes/No test)
    2. What is the resting spore count per gram of soil? (Quantitative test)

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  • Clubroot identified in Rocky View County southeast of Calgary

    Clubroot has been identified in a canola field south of Calgary in Southern Alberta. Although clubroot has been found in various counties in Alberta since 2003, this is the first confirmed case of the disease in Rockyview County. For more about the discovery and what to do about it….

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  • Fall fertilizer questions for 2018

    Question: After a couple of bad years, cash flow is tight. How can a farm reduce fertilizer costs while still keeping the door open for a good rebound yield?
    Answer: (1) Soil sampling is often more valuable after a bad year because reserves could still be high. A soil test may show higher than expected carryover. Note that after a dry year, soil nutrient reserves may be concentrated a little deeper so test to at least 12” and probably to 24”. …

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  • Still lots of green? It might not clear

    Canola that still has a lot of green seed might not de-green that much further. Green may have been locked in by frost and if more de-greening was possible, it probably should have happened already with the moisture over the past two weeks. When good harvest opportunities arise, the best bet at this stage of the season is probably to get that canola in the bin.

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  • When is ‘too late’ to assess stubble for blackleg?

    Field observations suggest that blackleg may be increasing in some areas. Official disease survey results for 2018 will be announced at Western Forum October 17-19. In the meantime, farmers and agronomist may still have time to count the percentage of plants that are diseased.

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  • Snow on canola standing for straight combining. What to do?

    Frost that comes with snow can actually help desiccate a fully-mature canola crop and any weed patches present, helping to prep canola for straight combining. If snow flattens the mature crop, do not swath.

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  • Prime the chopper for tough residue

    The combine chopper is an important tool for residue management. When harvesting in tough conditions, make sure chopper blades are in good shape and knives are sharp.

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  • WHY count canola stems in the fall?

    Counting stubble density in the fall can help growers determine if their spring seeding rate was adequate to reach the crop’s yield potential. Canola generally needs a bare minimum of 4-5 plants per square foot to reach its yield potential.

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  • Harvest aids don’t work in cool conditions

    Farmers are asking if there’s anything they can apply to get harvest moving. The answer is no, nothing that comes from a bottle. A return to warm, dry conditions will get harvest progressing again.

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  • Map of the Week – Precipitation

    How much precipitation fell over the past two weeks across the Prairies? This map from AAFC will answer which areas got the most and which got the least.

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  • Registration opens for CCC Convention 2019 in Montreal

    The Canola Council of Canada (CCC) and the Canada Grains Council (CGC) are working together to bring you the 2019 Canadian Crops Convention: Leading Change. Date: March 5-7, 2019 Location: Le Westin Montreal

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  • Tips for drying tough and damp canola

    With prospects for a lot of tough canola coming off once harvest picks up again, farmers will want a plan for how they’ll handle it. When adding heat to an aeration system, the general recommendation for this method is to increase air temperature to no more than 15-20°C. PAMI storage researcher Joy Agnew notes: “Hotter is NOT always better when using natural air drying with heat. You must match heat addition with your fan capacity. The more cubic feet per minute the fan blows, the more heat you can add.”

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