January 17, 2018 – Issue 1

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  • CCC Convention: Rise & Shine in Palm Springs!

    The Canola Council of Canada’s 51st annual convention in Palm Springs, March 6-8, is a dedicated time for the entire canola value chain to be together in one place to connect, learn and advance Canada’s greatest agricultural success story – canola.

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  • Fertilizer applications: “If there’s snow, don’t go”

    Winter is not the time to apply fertilizer. If logistics make it difficult to apply all nutrients around seeding time, the next best option is fall banding. Floating fertilizer over the snow is rarely a positive practice and the risk to farm accounts (from lost fertilizer investment) and the farm environment are just too great.

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  • UCC: 2017 results, 2018 plan

    UCC field-scale trials in 2016 and 2017 compared the farmer’s base nitrogen rate with a rate 25% higher. With all site years averaged, adding extra nitrogen did provide a statistically significant yield response, but the increased nitrogen did not always provide an economic return when compared to the base rate.

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  • Time for a mid-winter bin check

    Extended moments of warmer weather in winter can increase air and moisture movement inside bins. Put a priority on canola with moisture above 8% or higher dockage or green seed levels but take a moment to check in on all bins.

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  • Use CPT data for final seed decisions for 2018

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  • Crop rotation: Economics and agronomy

    Estimates are for another rise in canola acres in 2018. This will add further short- and long-term yield and agronomy pressure on fields that are already in tight rotations.

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  • Reader question: Do bertha armyworms in 2017 indicate higher risk for 2018?

    A reader from southeast of Saskatoon emailed this question: I had a field with bertha armyworms on the perimeter in 2017. Numbers were not quite enough to reach spray thresholds, but very close. (I likely should have sprayed the perimeter.) My plans are to seed the field next to it to canola this year. Will this second field likely have a bertha armyworm issue?

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  • Visit fieldheroes.ca to learn more about beneficials

    The Field Heroes website shows how natural enemies can help manage insect pest populations. Scouting is still necessary because beneficial insects do not always keep pest damage below economic levels, but spraying without consideration for economic thresholds can hurt the farm bottomline and also cause unnecessary damage to these beneficial insects.

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  • Engage with the CCC on social media

    Follow the CCC agronomy team members on Twitter, watch their videos on the YouTube channel and get updates through Facebook.

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