August 20, 2014 – Issue 20

Sub Categories

  • No categories
  • Four the week

    swathing canola

    Swath timing: is close, close enough? If you have some variability in the staging of your stand due to hail damage, drowned out areas, dry areas, heat blasting, insect damage, disease or weed issues, it will make swath timing a more complicated decision.

    Disease scouting: killing two tasks with one look. While you are out there checking to see if your crop is ready to cut/harvest is a perfect time to also check for disease! Likewise, the representative sampling technique used to accurately determine the stage of the crop is also ideal for disease scouting of your field. Pulling out a few plants and checking for the big three diseases, as well as any other issues, will save you an extra trip to the field. Early disease detection could save you thousands of dollars down the line!

    Bin combining? Here are some points to consider. Whether you’re waiting to get into the field or already cutting your crop, having a proper storage facility is critical. If you had last year’s grain in your bins for longer than usual, and into the spring when grain temperatures were no longer cold enough over specific durations to kill most insects, you may want to confirm your storage locations are ready for this year’s crop.

    Lygus: the reign continues. You may be sick of reading about it, but that’s better than being sick of finding it. Lygus bug continues to be a hot topic for growers in a number of locations across the prairies. While numbers are surprisingly high, they may still not be high enough to warrant the cost of spraying. Don’t let the idea of revenge influence your spraying decision-making process.

    READ MORE

  • Map of the week

    mapoftheweekaug20

    READ MORE

  • August 20 Quiz

    Mature but green seed

    Is canola ready to swath? Test your assessment skills.

    READ MORE

  • Swath timing: is close, close enough?

    Swathing

    If your crop is looking healthy and strong with uniform maturity, you will likely have no problem deciding when to swath. However, if you have some variability in the staging of your stand due to hail damage, drowned out areas, dry areas, heat blasting, insect damage, disease or weed issues, it will make swath timing a more complicated decision.

    READ MORE

  • Disease scouting: killing two tasks with one look

    While you are out there checking to see if your crop is ready to cut/harvest is a perfect time to also check for disease! Likewise, the representative sampling technique used to accurately determine the stage of the crop is also ideal for disease scouting of your field. Pulling out a few plants and checking for the big three diseases, as well as any other issues, will save you an extra trip to the field. Early disease detection could save you thousands of dollars down the line!

    READ MORE

  • Bin combining? Here are some points to consider.

    Bin

    Whether you’re waiting to get into the field or already cutting your crop, having a proper storage facility is critical. If you had last year’s grain in your bins for longer than usual, and into the spring when grain temperatures were no longer cold enough over specific durations to kill most insects, you may want to confirm your storage locations are ready for this year’s crop.

    READ MORE

  • Lygus: the reign continues

    Adult Lygus Bug
    You may be sick of reading about it, but that’s better than being sick of finding it. Lygus bug continues to be a hot topic for growers in a number of locations across the prairies. While numbers are surprisingly high, they may still not be high enough to warrant the cost of spraying. Don’t let the idea of revenge influence your spraying decision-making process. When you are making lygus population management decisions, be sure to consider that current thresholds are under review, and thought to be far too low. Read the latest article on lygus thresholds.

    READ MORE

  • The export effect: your spraying choice now may affect your worldwide market tomorrow

    Insects or disease may only have minor impacts on your yield at first, but spraying for them at the wrong time can have huge impacts on viable international markets by the end of the season. The canola industry works hard to keep a competitive, stable and open trade environment for canola and build strong relationships with customers around the world because international customers love clean Canadian canola. Make sure you help keep it clean by:

    Respecting Pre-Harvest Intervals (PHIs)
    Only using pesticides registered for use on canola
    Following canola storage recommendations
    Planting only R (resistant) or MR (moderately resistant) rated canola varieties
    Not growing de-registered varieties

    READ MORE

  • Coming Events

    Click to view upcoming events in the prairie provinces.

    READ MORE

Canola Watch