April 25, 2012 – Issue 9

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  • Issues of the week

    Weed control is a priority. Early weed control is a key step in profitable canola production. If seeding is still a few days or weeks away, walk or drive your fields to see if weeds are up and growing to determine when and if to spray. Winter annuals and dandelions will be up first and […]

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  • Control weeds early, save yield

    Even if growers don’t expect to seed any time soon, they may want to consider a pre-seed burnoff now to get weeds at smaller stages and before they draw down moisture and nutrients that their canola crops will need.

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  • Seeding based on soil temperature

    A good starting point for seeding canola is when the three-day average soil temperature in the seed zone is 4-5 C. Use a soil thermometer and take readings at 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. over a few days and average the results. Because canola is seeded at 1” deep, test the soil temperature at that depth.

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  • Wide range of seed weights

    If you plan to seed at 5 pounds per acre regardless of seed size, know the risks. Large-size seed planted at 5 pounds per acre may not achieve the safe minimum plant stand of 7 plants per square foot.

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  • Risk higher for herbicide carryover

    Herbicide carryover risk could be higher this year because some products may not have broken down as expected in 2011 due to extreme conditions. Also, with the increase in canola acres, some canola will go on land not planned for canola when growers made there herbicide decisions last year.

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  • Insect update: Diamondback moths early, striped flea beetles

    Striped flea beetles seem to be more common each year, especially in the northern canola growing regions. Research suggests that a population of striped flea beetles may do more feeding on seed-treated canola prior to control than a similar population of the crucifer type, so look closely when scouting.

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  • Canola not the best for fresh-broken pasture

    With Statistics Canada’s forecast of a record 20.4 million canola acres in Canada in 2012, some of those acres may be going onto freshly-broken pasture land. Expectations will be very low for canola seeded into these conditions because of weed competition, low nutrients, low moisture, poor seedbed, poor soil quality and wireworms.

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  • Give the drill a complete inspection

    A level drill is important for shallow seeded crops like canola. Also inspect openers, hoses, tank gaskets, meter rollers and manifolds for wear. Check that the electronics work properly and are calibrated.

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  • Still time for soil tests

    Spring fertilizer tests are the most accurate in predicting the soil nutrient situation at seeding time. Labs may be able to provide results within a few days or a week, so spring tests can be done without holding up the seeding process.

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  • Control weeds early and save yield

    Even if growers don’t expect to seed any time soon, they may want to consider a pre-seed burnoff now to get weeds at smaller stages and before they draw down moisture and nutrients that their canola crops will need. Products registered for use ahead of canola are CleanStart, Amitrol 240 and glyphosate.

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Canola Watch