June 13, 2012 – Issue 16

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  • Issues of the week

    Wind and rain have delayed weed control. We have articles this week on how to reduce spray drift when spraying in a little wind, and how to clean the tank properly between fields. Other topics include nitrogen and sulphur losses from excess rain, cutworms, diamondback moth larvae, blackleg and weed control windows.

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  • Photo quiz of the week

    What are these insects? Take the quiz to share your answers.

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  • Spray tank contamination: Risks and clean-out tips

    Canola can be damaged by trace herbicide residues left in a sprayer tank. This article underlines the importance of a complete clean out between products, and an understanding of what risks each product and each tank mix presents in terms of scrubbing effect and what may happen to a product or products if left in the tank for an extended period.

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  • Drift management tips

    To reduce drift, use coarse sprays and apply at lower pressure, spray with at least some wind (calm is bad), slow down, consider shrouds, and keep the boom low.

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  • Crop staging and herbicide timing

    Rain has set back weed spraying. Early canola crops are near the end of their spray windows, even though some fields have not received a first pass and some fields got a first pass but need a second. Label application windows:
    Glyphosate: Anytime up to and including the 6-leaf stage of canola.
    Liberty: Cotyledon stage up to the early bolting stage of canola.
    Odyssey/Absolute: 2- to 6-leaf stage of canola.

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  • N and S lost with heavy rains

    Heavy rains can increase nitrogen and sulphur leaching in lighter soils, and increase denitrification in heavier soils. While very good soil moisture conditions may increase canola yield potential, those rains may have depleted the nitrogen reserves somewhat. Top dressing is an option. Read more for topdressing tips.

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  • Cutworm scouting and control tips

    Cutworms can leave canola fields with bare patches, clipped plants and large chunks out of stems and leaves. Flocks of birds — crows, gulls, etc. — can be a sign that cutworms are present in large numbers, but nothing beats digging to confirm your suspicions. Cutworm thresholds are based on stand reduction, not actual cutworm counts. The threshold for canola is 25% to 30% stand reduction.

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  • Diamondback larvae near thresholds in some canola

    Before spraying for diamondback moth larvae, make sure that: 1. Large areas within the field have reached the nominal threshold of 25% or more of the leaf area lost. 2. Diamondback larvae are still present. 3. They are actively feeding. (Many diamondback moth larvae may have started to cocoon (pupate) and are no longer a threat.) 4. Newest leaves are being eaten. If the newest leaves are in good shape, the crop will probably grow through the threat.

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  • Disease watch: Blackleg and wirestem

    Early blackleg infection — from the cotyledon to 3-4 leaf stages — leads to the greatest yield loss. If growers see blackleg lesions on cotyledons or leaves early in the season, this may indicate a greater risk of potential blackleg problems. Fungicides are registered for blackleg management in canola.

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  • Coming events

    Alberta: June 14: Controlled Traffic Farming Crop Walk with Robert Ruwoldt, in Rolling Hills. June 19: Canola, winter wheat and pulse crop tour, Lacombe June 20: Growing with Canola crop walk, Hanna June 20: Growing with Canola crop walk, Consort June 21: Farming Smarter crop walk, Lethbridge Saskatchewan: July 11-24: Public Crop Research Field Days […]

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