May 2, 2012 – Issue 10

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  • Issues of the week

    Precipitation in many regions stopped seeding progress. While growers wait to get seeding again, check fields for emerging weeds and apply a pre-seed burnoff where necessary and when possible. By taking steps to increase canola seed survival, growers may be able to get away with seeding large seed at 5 lb./ac. While abiotic stresses such […]

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  • Striped flea beetles are tough and moving in

    Have you looked closely at your flea beetles lately? Striped flea beetles may not have been a problem in your area in the past, but populations are shifting. This is important because striped flea beetles start feeding earlier, and are more tolerant of seed treatments currently on the market.

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  • Weeds: Foxtail barley | Glyphosate-resistant kochia

    Foxtail barley has proliferated in some fields that were unseeded last year due to excess moisture. If it’s in patches, tillage may be the best way to control it. Pre-seed applications when shoots are small and all energy is moving upward through the weed are not always that effective. Waiting until the foxtail barley is bolting may provide a better kill, but by then done a lot of damage in terms of tying up moisture and nutrient.

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  • Clubroot management: Wet soil increases risk of spread

    Soil on seeding equipment is a key vector for the movement of clubroot spores from field to field. Cleaning dirt from equipment before leaving a clubroot-infested field is a good disease management practice. Avoid working in known clubroot-infested fields when soil is wet and more likely to stick to equipment.

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  • Extra inputs: Increase N rate or go with seed-applied nutrient product?

    Think critically when it comes to input investments. Canola plants, like any other plant, need many different nutrients and rely on naturally-occurring hormones to grow and produce a good yield. Limitation on any of these may reduce yield potential. But, in most cases when it comes to crop nutrition, the biggest return on investment comes from nitrogen, followed by sulphur and phosphorus.

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  • Know your sulphur product

    Sulphur does not provide a pop up effect, so seed-row placement is not necessary. Some sulphur could go in the seed row, but pay attention to safe seed-placed rates. Ammonium sulphate can have a damaging effect on the seedlings, both from the nitrogen and sulphur components. You’re likely also applying ammonium phosphate in the seed row, so note the limit on how much nitrogen can be safely added to the seed row blend.

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  • Tips to increase seed survival

    If growers are unable to modify agronomic practices to increase survival rates, their only choice to achieve the minimum recommended 7 plants per square foot is to use a higher seeding rate.

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  • Dense uniform stand key for first time growers

    A canola crop that starts off strong provides a buffer against most other problems that may occur throughout the season. New growers who may not be familiar with the pests and harvest management quirks of canola will benefit most from this buffer.

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  • Test carryover seed

    If seed carried over on the farm comes back with a low germination test, it is probably best to keep that seed separate and increase the seeding rate accordingly, assuming the viability is still high enough to be worth planting. If you can’t wait for germination test results before seeding, get the test anyway. If any problems arise with emergence, the germination test will be an important clue.

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  • Scout early to detect seedling diseases

    Growers who seeded canola a couple weeks ago will want to start scouting now for emergence issues. Often if seed and seedlings are damaged by rots and blights, which tend to be a more common occurrence in cool soils, they will quickly dry up and disappear. You need to act fast to accurately diagnose the problem.

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  • Maximize glyphosate performance — tips

    Glyphosate works best when applied during daylight hours, and when temperatures are warm and humidity high. Read on for more weather and water tips to improve glyphosate performance.

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