May 18, 2011 – Issue 8

Sub Categories

  • No categories
  • Issues of the week

    Strong winds have dried out the top inch of soil in many parts of Alberta and western Saskatchewan. Many canola fields could use a rain, as growers are seeding deeper to hit moisture. While growers rush to seed, take time during each day to scout for flea beetles on emerging crop, especially if wind has […]

    READ MORE

  • Crop and weather report

    Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Canola seeding is around 25% complete across the region and progressing well. Warm temperatures and high winds have dried out the topsoil, and many growers are seeding deeper to hit moisture. Alberta: Canola seeding progressed quickly over the past week and is over 50% complete in the south and around 25% […]

    READ MORE

  • Seeding down to moisture OK in mid May

    Seeding deep to chase moisture is rarely a good idea early in the season. That situation changes with the warm soils of mid to late May. Seeding 1.5” to 2” deep to hit moisture will hasten germination and crop establishment in fields where the top 1” is too dry to allow germination and emergence.

    READ MORE

  • Look on stems for flea beetles

    It could be a heavy year for flea beetle feeding, especially since a lot of canola will emerge right at peak activity for the insect. High winds may force flea beetles off leaf tops and down to leaf undersides and leaf stems. This could actually make the situation worse, since it takes just a few bites on a stem to nip off a whole cotyledon or sever the stem. Stem feeding, if it’s happening on a lot of plants, has a lower control threshold than the 25% damage recommended for leaf feeding.

    READ MORE

  • Benefits of early scouting

    Scouting now will identify early insect and weed pressure, identify establishment problems that may have been the result of drill settings or drill malfunction, and give you a benchmark to work from in the event of frost or wind losses.

    READ MORE

  • Learn to identify pest cutworms

    Cutworms are showing up in big numbers in some fields across the Prairies, particularly in northeastern Alberta. Check emerged canola crops for bare patches, holes or notches in foliage, and clipped plants — telltale signs of cutworm feeding. At least four cutworm specifies may damage canola: pale western, redbacked, army and dingy. It helps to know which ones are doing the damage in a field.

    READ MORE

  • Spray big weeds before seeding

    The economic return will be higher than if the grower seeded over these large weeds and then took a chance on getting them sprayed before crop emergence.

    READ MORE

  • CleanStart is it for volunteer RR canola

    It may be tempting to try other products, but these products are not registered. The whole point of controlling volunteer canola and early weeds is to give the canola crop a head start. But if unregistered herbicides are setting back the canola crop and thinning the stand, the whole purpose of a pre-seed burnoff is compromised.

    READ MORE

  • Thin stands often better than reseeding

    A thin stand at the end of May has better yield and quality potential than the alternative, which is reseeding. The key is to protect those few plants. Thresholds for everything are lower with a thin stand.

    READ MORE

  • If soil test results are unexpected…

    Any time you get an unexpected soil test result, it would be worth doing the test again. Growers will not want to hold up seeding while waiting for soil test results, but if new test results are lower than the first results, growers could apply an in-crop top up.

    READ MORE

  • Safe rates of seed-placed nitrogen

    Safe rates of seed placed fertilizer depend on seedbed moisture conditions, soil type, row-width utilization, and nitrogen source. For example, the safe rate of seed-placed nitrogen is only 10 pounds of actual nitrogen per acre when using a 1” knife on 9” spacing and seeding into moist, medium soils.

    READ MORE

Canola Watch