May 4, 2011 – Issue 6

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  • Issues of the week

    It’s true, early seeded canola does tend to produce higher yields, but that performance edge depends on good seed placement and stand establishment. Mudding in or broadcasting just to seed early can negate this yield benefit if it leads to poor crop establishment. So don’t panic. Yield potential generally remains high until after mid May […]

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  • Crop and weather update

    Peace (B.C. and Alberta): After good snowfall this winter, the Peace region has better soil moisture than it has had in years. Some peas are in the ground and canola seeding will start soon. Alberta: A few growers in Southern Alberta have started seeding, but rain in the forecast could halt what has already been […]

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  • Burnoff cleavers with the one-litre rate

    Fields with increasing populations of cleavers and other perennial and winter annual weeds will need a higher rate of pre-seed burnoff. The popular half-litre rate (180 grams of active per acre) is not likely enough. One litre (360 grams) per acre will control these weeds more effectively. And if cleavers and other winter annuals are larger, a 1.5-litre (540 gram) rate may be required.

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  • Weeds suck up moisture

    A ground cover of weeds may do growers a favour on fields too wet to seed. Weeds are better than evaporation in getting rid of water, especially from deeper soil layers. But don’t let these weeds get too big, as they may be difficult to control or prevent from going to seed once flowering starts.

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  • Can’t get all the sulphur you need?

    Some reports suggest sulphur fertilizer supplies may be limited in some areas this spring. If growers have trouble getting all the sulphur they need prior to seeding, divide what you have across all your canola acres, then top up with an in-crop application of ammonium sulphate.

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  • Seed shallow for faster emergence

    For all canola, whether seeded early or late, growers want to make sure they seed shallow — less than 1” deep — for faster and more uniform emergence.

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  • Seed only registered varieties

    Growers are reminded to make sure they seed registered varieties. Some older varieties that were once registered have been “deregistered” — meaning they are no longer approved in our export markets.

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  • Careful with canola seeded into pasture or hayland

    Fields taken out of pasture or hayland last year and planned for canola this year could have high wireworm and cutworm populations. Wireworms can wipe out a whole field of canola and no seed treatment or spray is registered for wireworm control in canola.

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  • Too early for broadcast seeding

    Don’t rush to broadcast seed. Canola seed placed into the soil at a uniform depth with starter fertilizer and light on-row packing is the best method for seed survival and uniform stand establishment. Drills do this job best. Floaters do not offer this same precise seed placement. And while a floater may be able to […]

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  • Please sign up again for the new Canola Watch

    Notice our new look? We’re making changes to provide you with more information in an easier format and, when necessary, targeted to your region’s specific issues. In an effort to deliver information that is relevant to your growing zone and growing patterns, please take half a minute to fill out our short sign up form. […]

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