August 10, 2011 – Issue 19

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  • Issues of the week

    Insects are the hottest topic this week, with managing uneven maturity at swathing and harvest a close second. Before spraying those insects, make sure the target insect is properly identified and check that it has reached economic control thresholds throughout the field. If you need to spray, evening spraying will avoid high temperatures that could […]

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  • Crop and weather update

    Peace (B.C. and Alberta): Rain fell across the whole region in the past week, with accumulations of three tenths to half an inch. Many areas still have standing water in fields. Earliest canola in the north is about three weeks from cutting. Late fields in the south are just coming out of flower and will […]

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  • Which worm is it: bertha, diamondback or cabbage?

    Before spraying, make sure the worms feeding on your canola are actually the species you think they are. Bertha armyworm, diamondback moth larvae and cabbageworms can be confused. Here’s how to tell the difference:

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  • Tips to control multiple insect species at once

    Economic spray thresholds are calculated based on individual species. We don’t have scientific evidence to combine thresholds, but where an “additive” effect of multiple species can make sense is when more than one species are feeding on key yield-producing areas — flowers, buds and pods — at the same time. For example, if you have lygus bug and cabbage seedpod weevil in the same field and if they are both at 50% to 60% of their economic spray thresholds, spraying may provide an economic benefit.

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  • How to sweep net properly

    Thresholds for lygus bugs and cabbage seedpod weevil, for example, are based on a specific sweep net technique. If you’re not doing a complete 180° pattern, walking while you sweep, and keeping the net near the top of the canopy, your counts could be significantly different from someone using the recommended techniques.

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  • When to swath multi-branched canola

    The ideal time to swath for yield and quality is when 50-60% of seeds on the main stem are turning color. At this stage, most seeds on the side branches will have reached maturity and will ripen in the swath. This may not be a safe assumption when very low plant counts result in heavily branched canola plants.

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  • Apply pre-harvest glyphosate only after seed moisture drops below 30%

    Growers considering a pre-harvest glyphosate cannot apply it to canola (RR or non-RR) until seed moisture drops to 30% or lower. This roughly coincides with 30% seed colour change. Spraying earlier raises the potential for glyphosate residue in seed.

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  • Lygus no threat when pods get leathery

    Lygus bug numbers are high in some fields, but remember that as pods harden and get leathery, lygus will not be able to penetrate and cause damage.

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  • How to scout for clubroot

    Growers are encouraged to examine strange disease patterns to see if clubroot has arrived on their farms.

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  • Is that sclerotinia or blackleg?

    Growers seeing stem lesions or pre-mature ripening should take a closer to identify the cause. There is a good chance it’s sclerotinia. But it could be blackleg. It’s important to identify the cause because it will help in management for next year.

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  • Keep malathion out of canola bins

    Malathion CANNOT be used to treat bins where canola will be stored or to treat canola as it goes in to storage.

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