August 4, 2011 – Issue 18

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  • Issues of the week

    Diamondback moth, bertha armyworm, cabbage seedpod weevil and lygus bug are at or near thresholds in areas. Keep scouting to avoid losses due to late season insects. High temperatures in previous weeks have really advanced canola growth and development. In the wetter areas, fields have dried out and crops are looking better. Some canola crops […]

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  • Crop and weather update

    Peace: Decent rain events fell in the region where they were needed (in the north and central Peace). Crops in the north look much better than they did a couple of weeks ago. Canola on heavy clay soils in the wetter southern Peace are starting to deteriorate – where water was standing a few weeks […]

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  • Insect update

    Growers in some areas are spraying for late season insects, including lygus, bertha armyworm and diamondback moth. Make sure to scout.

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  • Pay attention to pre-harvest intervals

    The pre-harvest interval is the number of days that must pass between the last application of a pesticide and cutting of the crop. Cutting is either swathing or straight cutting.

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  • Canola patches ripening pre-maturely? Take a closer look

    As the canola crop nears the end of the growing season, signs of premature ripening are quite prominent. This year it might be easy to assume that soil moisture stress is the culprit. However, it is important to scout and take a closer look to determine what has happened in those areas.

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  • Canola needs a month after flowering to mature

    If canola fields flowered for 20 to 25 days (as an average), then an additional 25 to 30 days are needed to finish off the growing season. At this rate, the majority of crops that are finished flowering should be swathed or ready to swath by the end of August.

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  • Tips to prepare for harvest

    Many crops are nearing the end of flowering or podding. Harvest decisions should be contemplated in the coming weeks. The following are tips to consider during the lead up to harvest.

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  • Does straight cut canola require a dry down product?

    Herbicides can be used to desiccate or dry down green weeds or crop to facilitate straight combining. Here are the choices and how to use them.

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  • Should I use a pod sealant?

    Pod sealants are polymer sprays meant to reduce shattering when straight combining. Recent western Canadian research at a limited number of trial locations has to date not indicated significant benefits overall, but some individual trials and producer experiences have occasionally been positive.

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  • Sunscald appearing

    Sunscald occurs when plants are ripening during periods of heat or other stresses. The main symptom is purpling on the stems and pods. The purpling is an abiotic stress response and does not cause yield loss.

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  • Blackleg appearing

    Growers are encouraged to scout canola and assess the level of blackleg damage before they harvest the crop.

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Canola Watch