June 15, 2011 – Issue 12

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  • Cleaning out the sprayer tank — tips

    Cleaning out the sprayer protects a sensitive crop, it protects people working with the sprayer, and it protects the sprayer and its components. The following article by AAFC’s Tom Wolf provides some handy tips.

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  • Issues of the week

    Weed control is top of mind for most growers. Many will finish their first in-crop herbicide pass this week, weather permitting. Insects are a close second to weeds. Flea beetles are active in all regions and spraying will be required in some cases, especially on fields with thin stands and/or slow crop growth from cool […]

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  • Crop and weather update

    Peace (B.C. and Alberta): The entire region could do with an inch of rain and some heat. Many fields have spotty emergence, and with cool, dry weather, many canola crops seem to have stalled at around the 4-leaf stage. Alberta: Southern Alberta has enough moisture for the most part. Central Alberta needs rain, although some […]

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  • Insect update

    Spraying has been required in pockets all across the Prairies, particularly for redbacked cutworms in the Peace region, central Alberta around Vermilion and Vegreville, and west central Saskatchewan. Flea beetles have been sprayed on early-seeded and slow developing canola. And the Peace region has grasshoppers eating fields already.

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  • Tips to control hard-to-wet weeds

    For weeds that do not “wet” easily avoid using very coarse droplets, and use high water volumes.

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  • Flush sprayer tanks properly between products

    A water rinse is not usually enough to remove herbicide residue from the sprayer system. Herbicides can bind to the tanks and hoses, and most need water plus a cleaning solution to remove them. If not, you never know when the bound herbicide molecules will be released.

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  • Spraying a multi-stage crop

    When canola is at multiple stages within one field and when weeds are at multiple stages, it can be a challenge to choose the right spray timing. The key is to assess the stage that represents the majority of canola plants.

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  • Herbicide carryover can stop emergence

    Seedlings that curl up and start to brown off before emergence could be infected with seedling disease. But they could also be damaged by herbicide carryover. If you suspect herbicide damage, here are two hints that soil herbicide carryover may be the cause:
    —Residual herbicide has been used on the field before.
    —Symptoms appear worse on hilltops or valleys.

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  • Management for a thin stand

    Step one with a thin stand is to determine the cause so it can be prevented next year. Step two is to scout closely and take extra care to protect those few plants from insect damage and weed competition.

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  • Coming events

    Canola Council of Canada agronomy specialists will be involved in the upcoming tours and events.

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Canola Watch