2009 – Issue 6

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  • Take a plant stand count

      While scouting for disease and insects, take time to assess the stand. If the stand is spotty and thin, be more conservative with thresholds when protecting the crop from insects, diseases and weed competition. Also, recording the average number of plants per square foot will help growers improve seeding methods for 2011. Stands of […]

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  • Canola Continues to Battle Mother Nature

    Environmental issues continue to dominate canola production across western Canada. Cool daytime temperatures with unseasonably cold nighttime temperatures occurred across the Prairies last week and over the weekend. All regions reported frost on multiple occasions with some areas experiencing frost four times last week. The most severe frost happened Friday night/Saturday morning where temperatures ranged […]

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  • Slow Growth and Development Continues

    Poor growing conditions due to the cold weather and repeated frosts prevailed across western Canada again last week. Canola growth and development was stalled. Canola ranges from cotyledon to 4-leaf stage and is delayed by at least two to three weeks. In Manitoba, Growing Degree Days (GDD) to date range between 40 to 60% of […]

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  • Frost – Patience Not Panic

    Frost was widespread all across western Canada last week. From all reports, crop damage is quite variable – both within an area and within a single field. This is expected because many variables will affect a crop’s ability to withstand frost (duration of the frost, crop staging, crop residue, low lying areas, crop vigor, etc.) […]

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  • How to Assess the Level of Frost Damage

    To evaluate a field, walk an X or W path across the field and note all plants that will survive in a 1/4 m2 (3 ft2) area every 20 paces. This should be 50 to 100 samples. Record an observation from each sample. Calculate the percentage of the field that has adequate plant recovery. The […]

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  • Before Writing off the Crop

    Before making re-seed decisions consider the following: Take a close look. Get down, way down, at ground level and look for signs of recovery. A plant with a green, intact growing point can still continue to grow. A magnifying glass will help zero-in on the tiny plant parts. Scratch around and scrape back crop residue […]

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  • Foliar Feeding has Merit?

    There are reports of macronutrients and micronutrients being foliar applied to frosted, stalled crops to give the plants a boost. Canola Council of Canada agronomists are not aware of any scientific research to date here in western Canada that supports the economics of this practice. However, if growers do apply a foliar application, they should […]

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  • Things to Consider for the Re-Seed or Late Seeding Decision

    Re-assess the maturity of the chosen variety. It may be getting too late to plant longer season varieties based on the frost-free period remaining. If necessary, ask a local retailer to suggest other suitable varieties for the area. Keep crop insurance deadlines in mind. The crop insurance seeding deadline for Saskatchewan is June 20. In […]

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  • Thin Stands Common

    Canola fields with low plant densities are more vulnerable to losses from insects, weed competition and environmental stresses such as fall frosts. Crops with low plant densities need to be managed more intensely. More frequent and intensive scouting for pests (insects and weeds) is critical because any losses are more likely to reduce yield. Action […]

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  • If Re-Seeding, Leave a Checkstrip

    The decision to re-seed is not an easy one, especially this far into June. Ultimately it is the growing conditions for the remainder of the season that will determine if the decision to re-seed was correct. If you have made the decision to re-seed, leave a checkstrip, preferably in the centre of the field. This […]

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  • More Cutworms Appearing

    Reports of cutworms continued this week across western Canada. Cutworm damage often appears as bare patches showing up across the field. Plants in these areas will be wilted or dead and have been chewed off below the soil surface. Generally the pale western and red-backed cutworms are of economic importance in canola on the Prairies. […]

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  • Worms and Other Soil Invertebrates

    While digging for cutworms, you may encounter other worms. Species in the enchytraeid family are pale white to grey, segmented worms and usually one to two cm (but can be up to five cm) in length. When magnified, these worms resemble earthworms. These creatures are beneficial insects that function in decaying organic matter and nutrient […]

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  • Cabbage Seedpod Weevils Spotted

    Cabbage seedpod weevils have been reported in southern Alberta (Medicine Hat area). Owen Olfert, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada – Saskatoon, is about to roll out the prairie-wide monitoring program for this season and we will relay the results as the season progresses. Although it is too early in the season to begin control measures for […]

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  • In-crop Weed Spraying Next

    Many producers were unable to do a pre-seed burn-off so it is critical to maximize efficiency with the first in-crop pass. The first step is scouting to determine weed species present and staging. Some growers are noticing that the grassy weeds are present and need to be controlled, whereas broadleaf weeds are slower to emerge. […]

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  • Frost & Spraying – Wait if Possible

    Frost can interfere with herbicide performance and crop tolerance. After a light frost, it is important to wait until temperatures rebound in the middle of the day before spraying. After a heavier frost that caused damage (leaves are yellowed or necrotic), wait for plants to recover before spraying. New leaf growth should be visible on […]

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  • Spraying Tips

    Water quality is the key to achieving proper performance of many herbicides, particularly with glyphosate and many grassy weed products. The following link provides more information on spray water quality: http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex7573 Custom applicators (and growers in general) should double check to ensure the right product is being applied to the right field. Ensure legal land […]

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  • Be a Good Neighbor

    Spray drift can be costly (liability-wise) but also gives agriculture a negative image. Pay attention to boom height, nozzle selection, water volume, pressure, wind speed and direction, etc. Calibrate your sprayer before spray season begins. Be a good neighbor and make certain the product applied hits the target and the target only. The following link has […]

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  • Recruiting Disease Survey Participants

    Faye Dokken, Provincial Specialist – Plant Diseases with Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture is looking for cooperators to participate in a canola disease survey this summer. Representatives from the Ministry would like permission to enter canola fields and collect a soil sample (for clubroot screening). While at the field, representatives will also take note of other […]

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