2009 – Issue 5

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  • Emergence Challenges

    Emergence Challenges Canola seeding is virtually complete in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Where soil moisture is adequate for germination, cool temperatures and late-spring frosts are stalling canola growth and development. Emerged fields range from the cotyledon to 2- or 3-leaf stage. Where conditions are dry (south and west-central SK and southeast-central Alberta), some canola is stranded […]

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  • Frost Again

    Frost was widespread Tuesday morning all across western Canada. Overnight lows were recorded in the neighborhood of 0 to minus 2°C with some areas reporting minus 3°C. Temperatures in this range are usually labeled a ‘light frost’ and significant crop damage is not expected. However, many variables will affect a crop’s ability to withstand frost […]

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  • Patience Rather Than Panic

    Resist the urge to re-seed immediately after this frost, as recovery can turn out to be better than expected. Wait at least three to four days to determine if the growing point is still intact and new green growth is visible. The frost may thin the stand only, especially in low lying areas. As a […]

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  • Things to Consider for the Re-Seed or Late Seeding Decision

    Re-assess the maturity of the chosen variety. It may be getting too late to plant longer season varieties based on the frost-free period remaining. If necessary, ask a local retailer to suggest other suitable varieties for the area. Keep crop insurance deadlines in mind. The crop insurance seeding deadline for Saskatchewan is June 20. In […]

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  • Slow Growth Continues

    Warm temperatures continue to be elusive. Parts of Alberta and Saskatchewan had seasonal temperatures on the weekend but most areas continue to experience below average daytime and nighttime temperatures. In Manitoba, Growing Degree Days (GDD) to date range between 40 to 60% of normal (http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/climate/wad00s00/cropwxrep.pdf). As a result, emergence, growth and development are also lagging. […]

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  • What is Taking So Long?

    Across the Prairies this spring, emergence is very slow and in some fields, uneven. Research has shown much lower and slower canola germination at low temperatures. Soil temperatures above 5°C have little effect on the time to 50% germination; however, the number of days to 50% germination increases dramatically at temperatures below 4°C (with germination […]

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  • Cutworms Appearing

    Reports of cutworms (in populations high enough to warrant spraying or to destroy significant acreages where they were missed) have been reported in isolated fields right across western Canada. Cutworm damage often appears as bare patches showing up across the field. Plants in these areas will be wilted or dead and have been chewed off […]

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  • Worms and Other Soil Invertebrates

    While digging for wireworms and cutworms, you may encounter other worms. Species in the enchytraeid family are pale white to grey, segmented worms and usually one to two cm (but can be up to five cm) in length. When magnified, these worms resemble earthworms. These creatures are beneficial insects that function in decaying organic matter […]

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  • In-crop Weed Spraying Next On the ‘To Do’ List

    Many producers were unable to do a pre-seed burn-off so it is critical to maximize efficiency with the first in-crop pass. The first step is scouting to determine weed species present and staging. Some growers are noticing that the grassy weeds are present and need to be controlled, whereas broadleaf weeds are slower to emerge. […]

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  • Spraying Tips

    Water quality is the key to achieving proper performance of many herbicides, particularly with glyphosate and many grassy weed products. The following link provides more information on spray water quality: http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex7573 Custom applicators (and growers in general) should double check to ensure the right product is being applied to the right field. Ensure legal land […]

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  • Be a Good Neighbor

    Spray drift can be costly (liability-wise) but also gives agriculture a negative image. Pay attention to boom height, nozzle selection, water volume, pressure, wind speed and direction, etc. Calibrate your sprayer before spray season begins. Be a good neighbor and make certain the product applied hits the target and the target only. The following link […]

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  • Recruiting Disease Survey Participants

    Faye Dokken, Provincial Specialist – Plant Diseases with Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture is looking for cooperators to participate in a canola disease survey this summer. Representatives from the Ministry would like permission to enter canola fields and collect a soil sample (for clubroot screening). While at the field, representatives will also take note of other […]

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Canola Watch