2009 – Issue 16

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  • In Some Locales, The Skies Opened Up

      In Some Locales, The Skies Opened Up Across western Canada rainfall was common late last week and over the weekend. Rainfall amounts generally averaged one to two inches but some areas reported much more (three to five inches in parts of northern Manitoba including the Swan River Valley; in Saskatchewan: up to five inches […]

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  • Brief Heat, More Needed

    The risk of an early fall frost and its impact on crop quality continues to be one of the greatest concerns.  A few days of summer-like temperatures (high 20’s to low 30’s) appeared in a number of areas before the rains began and crop development was noticeably accelerated. However, it was not long-lived and it […]

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  • Possible to Reduce Frost Damage?

    A number of products are being marketed to enhance the crops’ protection from environmental stresses such as frost. The Canola Council of Canada agronomists are not aware of any scientific research in western Canada to support such claims. Growers who are considering applying a product for such a purpose are encouraged to ask for scientific […]

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  • Lygus Numbers Variable – Scout Thoroughly

    Lygus populations continue to be monitored in the Peace Region of Alberta and BC and in southern Alberta. Populations are variable as many fields are exceeding economic thresholds (as much as three to four times higher) and still many others remain below threshold levels. Each field must be assessed for lygus on an individual basis. […]

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  • Grasshoppers Migrating?

    Grasshoppers appear to be migrating into canola fields to feed on pods in the drier parts of southwestern Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan. Continue scouting for grasshoppers because if caught early, perimeter spraying may be all that is needed.  A specific economic threshold for grasshoppers in canola has not been established as it is not a […]

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  • How to Even-Out an Uneven Stand?

    Council agronomists are starting to field a number of calls about how to hasten maturity of late canola plants within a field. Uneven fields are not good candidates for straight cutting. Applying a desiccant to an uneven crop will still leave too much green material and this material can cause significant problems in storage. With […]

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  • Harvest Around the Corner – Where is the Greatest Potential?

    During pod fill is a good time to assess yield potential leading up to harvest. The variable staging this year has not evened out and will require more management at harvest. It may be beneficial to mark or section off fields based on similar staging and yield potential. Know where the greatest yield potential is […]

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  • Variable Stages Benefit from Pod Sealant?

    With the variable stages in this year’s canola crop, questions about the benefits of applying a pod sealant are surfacing. Pod sealants are relatively new to the Canadian marketplace and limited scientific research has been conducted with these products under western Canadian conditions. These products are designed to reduce shattering losses by preventing the pods […]

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  • Anchoring Short Canola Stands

    Questions are starting about swathing this year’s crop with low plant stands and shortened crop height, as the ability to anchor the swath to the stubble likely will be hampered. To reduce potential losses from swaths blowing, keep the following recommendations in mind: Swath in the direction of the typical prevailing winds in the area. […]

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  • Check for Colour Change on Side Branches Too

    As the calendar progresses and the risk of fall frost nears, it may be tempting to swath earlier than optimal. Growers must ensure that seed colour change is occurring when assessing the proper time to swath. Do not use plant or pod colour to gauge proper timing because some pods will appear ripe on the […]

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