Put bin checks on your spring to-do list

April 3, 2014 - Issue 4

As outside air warms up, moisture migration cycles in the bin can concentrate warm moist air, creating a potential start point for spoilage.

As outside air warms up, moisture migration cycles in the bin can concentrate warm moist air, creating a potential start point for spoilage.

Canola may be stored longer than usual and in bigger quantities this year. As outside temperatures warm up, it becomes important to check bins again to make sure canola inside safely makes the transition from winter to spring and summer. Movement of air and moisture inside bins is greatest when the temperature difference between inside and outside is greatest. Increased air movement inside bins moves moisture to concentrated areas, and increases the spoilage risk. (See the diagram.)

In general, grain bags are not an ideal option for long-term canola storage. Canola in bags is probably best moved now before the ground softens too much to hold extraction equipment and trucks. Grain storage bags emptied now are also out of the way before field work begins.

Transferring canola from bags to bin or bin to bin during colder temperatures will also help prevent spoilage in the longer term, given that you’re not letting that exposed grain warm up during the transfer. Keeping grain cooler will reduce the storage risk after relocation.

Canola Watch