Weeds

  • Spraying weeds in November

    Weeds

    Warm weather has some weeds showing and growing again. If weeds are green, leaf tissue is still relatively pliable and temperatures are relatively warm, growers may still have an opportunity to control perennial and winter annual weeds.

    READ MORE

  • Spraying weeds after frost and snow

    Weeds

    When freezing temperatures stop fall weed control plans, snow is likely more of a help than a hindrance with respect to overall weed condition. The snow layer is likely to insulate the weed leaf material from the colder conditions that follow it. That could mean you’re back spraying earlier than you would be with frost alone. Spray decisions — when to spray or whether to spray at all — will depend on leaf condition after the snow is gone.

    READ MORE

  • Top 10: Planning for next season

    Weeds

    fall_weeds_cut_whetter600

    In preparation for next season, here are a few field and office jobs and WHEN to start them.

    READ MORE

  • When to spray weeds in the fall?

    Weeds

    Fall is a good time to control perennial and winter annual weeds, but spraying immediately after harvest may not provide the best results. Perennial weeds cut off at harvest need time to accumulate new leaf tissue to absorb herbicides. Four weeks is a minimum recommendation and six weeks is ideal.

    READ MORE

  • Fall weed control: pre-canola options

    Weeds

    Canola is sensitive to carryover from many herbicides. Here’s the list of products that could be used this fall on fields planned for canola next spring, but read the notes carefully.

    READ MORE

  • Fall weeds: When to spray?

    Weeds

    Narrow-leaved hawk's beard

    Fall is a good time to control perennial and winter annual weeds, but…(1) Wait for post-harvest regrowth and (2) Know the best timing for the weeds present.

    READ MORE

  • Weed management before and after harvest

    Weeds

    Pre-harvest weeds and green crop. Credit: Ian Epp

    Pre-harvest is a good time to dry down weeds to make straight combining go more smoothly. A pre-harvest application can also provide some weed control on late growing weeds — but is often too late to stop seed production.

    READ MORE

  • Pre-harvest products for use in canola

    Weeds

    Glyphosate is registered for pre-harvest perennial weed control in canola. Glyphosate is to be applied when the majority of seeds are yellow to brown in colour and seed moisture is less than 30%. Heat fits between glyphosate and Reglone on the speed of dry down spectrum. Reglone is a contact herbicide (only kills what it contacts) and is registered in canola to dry immature green material to facilitate harvest. Reglone shuts the plant down quickly and basically STOPS it from maturing, which can lock in high green seed levels if applied prematurely.

    READ MORE

  • Check suspicious weeds for herbicide resistance

    Weeds

    Kochia stands above the canola canopy. You might want to check them for glyphosate resistance. Source: Ian Epp

    Surviving weeds are growing strong and some of them — like kochia and wild oats — start to look really obvious by this time of year.

    READ MORE

  • Herbicide issues: Late spraying, drift, carryover

    Weeds

    Second applications applied late can reduce profitability it two ways: A competitive crop growing ahead of the weeds may not need a second application. A late application can cause a surprising level of hidden damage to canola plants, setting back yield potential.

    READ MORE

Canola Watch