Insects

  • Flea beetle thresholds

    Insects

    The economic thresholds – the point at which foliar insecticide provides an economic benefit – could be when damage reaches 50%, but leaf area loss can reach this stage fairly quickly when flea beetle numbers are high, they are actively feeding, and damage is already at 25%.

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  • 9 steps to make the right flea beetle spray decision

    Insects

    Fleabeetle_underleaf_BrunoSK_May272015_AmandaWuchner small

    While only a small percentage of canola fields tend to require flea beetle management in addition to seed treatment, all fields should be monitored to assess the potential threat. Begin monitoring right after emergence and through until at least the four-leaf stage. Seed treatment can be effective through most of this period, but slow starting or slow growing crops under intense flea beetle pressure may require a foliar spray.

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  • Insects: Cutworms in some fields

    Insects

    Cutworms have been observed in some regions, including the southeast Peace region and west-central Saskatchewan stretching into Alberta. In western Saskatchewan, early observations suggest that cutworms are worse in fields that had lentils last year. In general, fields that had flowering plants (crops or weed patches) in August or September of the previous year may have higher cutworm counts. These flowers attract the adult moths, which lay their eggs in these areas. The nominal threshold for cutworms is 25-30% lost plants in a field or confined area.

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  • BeeConnected app: Register to help protect bee colonies

    Insects

    The free BeeConnected app helps to ensure that bees and agriculture can co-exist and thrive. The application allows farmers to tell beekeepers in their area when they plan to use crop protection products (including pesticide applications and the planting of treated seed). Beekeepers who have registered their hives will receive a notification if they are within five kilometres of the planned activity.

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  • Plant a Buzzing Garden

    Insects

    By planting a Buzzing Garden, we can all help to improve the number and quality of honey bee food sources, and support them in feeding their hives. Every free Buzzing Gardens kit contains seeds for five different species of non-invasive Canadian wildflowers recommended by Pollinator Partnership, and can plant a garden up to five square feet. Order your free seed kit at beesmatter.ca.

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  • Insects: Cutworm guide, DBM monitoring

    Insects

    AAFC has published a new cutworm guide, available as a free download, with descriptions of all pest cutworms in Canada as well as helpful management tips, including this excerpt from the scouting section….

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  • New midge video

    Insects

    The Canola Council of Canada has a new video describing swede midge, its life cycle and the damage it can cause canola crops in Western Canada. The video also mentions the new midge that is similar to but distinct from swede midge.

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  • New midge in canola

    Insects

    Distorted canola growth thought to be from swede midge (Contarinia nasturtii) is likely caused by two separate midge species. Scientists were suspicious that two midge species were present in canola in Western Canada when pheromone traps specific to swede midge were not catching any even though midge were present at relatively high numbers in fields […]

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  • Pest survey results for 2016

    Insects

    Around 90% of surveyed fields had some sclerotinia stem rot in 2016. This graphs shows the percentage of plants infected (incidence), by province.

    Results from the disease survey show increases in sclerotinia stem rot incidence. Blackleg incidence is down from 2015 in Manitoba and Saskatchewan and up in Alberta.

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  • Swede midge update

    Insects

    Alberta Agriculture & Forestry surveys detected swede midge larvae within flower buds at multiple sites — but densities were very low. Preliminary data indicates that distribution of swede midge within Saskatchewan has increased in 2016 compared to 2015.

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