Insects

  • New midge video

    Insects

    The Canola Council of Canada has a new video describing swede midge, its life cycle and the damage it can cause canola crops in Western Canada. The video also mentions the new midge that is similar to but distinct from swede midge.

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  • New midge in canola

    Insects

    Distorted canola growth thought to be from swede midge (Contarinia nasturtii) is likely caused by two separate midge species. Scientists were suspicious that two midge species were present in canola in Western Canada when pheromone traps specific to swede midge were not catching any even though midge were present at relatively high numbers in fields […]

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  • Pest survey results for 2016

    Insects

    Around 90% of surveyed fields had some sclerotinia stem rot in 2016. This graphs shows the percentage of plants infected (incidence), by province.

    Results from the disease survey show increases in sclerotinia stem rot incidence. Blackleg incidence is down from 2015 in Manitoba and Saskatchewan and up in Alberta.

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  • Swede midge update

    Insects

    Alberta Agriculture & Forestry surveys detected swede midge larvae within flower buds at multiple sites — but densities were very low. Preliminary data indicates that distribution of swede midge within Saskatchewan has increased in 2016 compared to 2015.

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  • Bertha armyworm: A few warm spots

    Insects

    Bertha armyworms, various colours. Photo credit: Devin Pendree

    While economic levels of damage have not been reported anywhere yet this year, individual fields could experience isolated high numbers.

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  • Lygus thresholds: Good vs dry conditions

    Insects

    Lygus. Credit: Dan Johnson

    In dry conditions: Threshold tables for lygus indicate that if canola is $12 per bushel and spray costs $8 per acre, the threshold at the early pod stage is 5 lygus adults or late instar nymphs per 10 sweeps (0.5 per sweep).
    In moist and high-yield conditions: The economic threshold is likely quite a bit higher. At early pod stage, the lowest action threshold to consider in good growing conditions could be 10-20 per 10 sweeps (1-2/sweep). At the late pod stage, 50 lygus per 10 sweeps (5 per sweep) at could cause a 2 bu./ac. reduction in yield — which could be a more suitable economic threshold in this situation.

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  • Why so few insects this year?

    Insects

    Pod-eating insects — including bertha armyworm, lygus and diamondback moth larvae — are at low levels in general in 2016. The biggest factors regulating insect populations are (1) weather, (2) natural enemies and (3) competing food sources. Each is working in favour of lower insect pest pressure this year.

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  • Curled pods are usually thrips damage

    Insects

    Western flower thrips. Credit: Olds College

    Three thrips species will feed on canola in Canada and only one — western flower thrips, (Frankliniella occidentalis) — causes pod curling.

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  • July 20 Quiz — What’s in your sweep net?

    Insects

    Beneficial Insect_ 4 Ladybug larvae Lygus and Diamond Back Moth_Olds_Aug10 2015_Keith Gabert

    You may find quite menagerie of insects in your net after 10 sweeps. Can you correctly identify these five?

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  • Lygus bugs: ID, scouting tips and thresholds

    Insects

    Lygus. Credit: Dan Johnson

    Lygus have piercing, sucking mouth parts, which they use to pierce pods and drain immature seeds. This is where the major yield loss occurs from lygus.

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