Heated seed

  • Alert: Sudden rise in heated canola

    Heated seed

    Heated canola, the brown burned seeds, mean an immediate downgrade.

    Some canola growers have reported rising temperatures in their canola bins. Growers are encouraged to check all canola bins as soon as possible. Heating can start small and go unnoticed for days and perhaps weeks. Cooling the bin and stopping this early heating now can save a lot of money in lost grade and lost delivery options.

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  • Canola stays hot for weeks

    Heated seed

    Heated canola, the brown burned seeds, mean an immediate downgrade.

    Canola binned hot will retain that heat for weeks and likely months, with the risk of storage losses rising with each passing day. Growers who binned hot canola in September and August will want to check that the temperature has come down to a safe storage level of below 15°C. Putting hot canola on air or turning it on a cool day is essential. Ideally, this is done soon after binning, but now may be soon enough to arrest the heating process.

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  • Top 10 risky situations for canola storage

    Heated seed

    Bin cables give you an easy way to check temperatures inside the core.

    The number one risk: Neglected bins. Growers are busy enough at harvest just getting the crop off, but take time to check all bins within the first two weeks after filling, and then again a couple more times until the canola is cool and winter sets in. Canola seed continues to sweat during the first 4 to 6 weeks after harvest, making this a critical period to move air through the bin and remove that moist air. It cannot always wait until after harvest. Canola can jump from 30°C to 50°C and beyond in two weeks or less.

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Canola Watch