Harvest and Storage

  • Check your bins

    Harvest and Storage

    Moving canola from one bin to another is a good chance to cool it off, break up any potential hot spots and give the grain a good inspection.

    While the priority is on combining for many canola growers this November, please take time to check the storage situation for canola already harvested.

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  • Alert: What to do with high moisture canola?

    Harvest and Storage

    Weather is finally allowing for some harvest to resume across the Prairies, but the concern now is how to handle canola will undoubtedly come off very tough, or damp. Try to make a plan prior to taking it off the field, as even at low temperatures the bulk will likely be quite volatile. Spoilage can occur rapidly. These steps will help improve conditioning results and reduce risk:

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  • Snow on canola. What to do?

    Harvest and Storage

    Snow on canola swaths in Saskatchewan. October 5, 2016. Credit: Ian Epp

    Snow on swathed canola will delay harvest, just like a rain would, but all a grower can do in this situation is wait it out. Snow on standing canola could be another matter.

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  • Tips for drying tough and damp canola

    Harvest and Storage

    Canola is considered “tough” at moisture levels between 10% and 12.5%. “Damp” is anything above that. With tough canola, aeration can be enough to dry it to safe storage levels as long as air has capacity to dry: warm with low relatively humidity (RH). At RH values above 70%, the equilibrium moisture content will be above 8% to 9%, meaning sufficient drying for safe long term storage is difficult to achieve. Drying canola with aeration alone also requires sufficient air flow and time to move the drying front to the top of the grain mass. Damp canola will require heated air drying and rigorous management to condition it for safe storage.

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  • Tough canola can heat quickly

    Harvest and Storage

    We heard a report this week of tough canola starting to heat after just two days in the bin. This is a good reminder to put canola on aeration right after harvest, especially if it’s tough or hot or both. Waiting a couple weeks until all the combining is done may be too late.

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  • What to do with wind-blown swaths

    Harvest and Storage

    wind-blown-swaths_cornelsen

    Step 1: Contact crop insurance
    Step 2: Combine once the crop is cured
    Step 3: Thanks about volunteer management
    Step 4: Consider how this may be prevented

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  • Tips for drying tough and damp canola

    Harvest and Storage

    Turn on the fans to cool that hot canola.

    No matter how good the harvest weather or how dry the harvested crop, all canola should be conditioned after it goes into the bin to ensure safe long-term storage — especially if it goes into the bin warm. For tough and damp canola, the spoilage risk is much higher.

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  • Frost on canola left for straight combining

    Harvest and Storage

    Frost provides some natural desiccation that may help dry weeds and green stems in fields left for straight combining. Some growers actually wait for frost before combining, using it as a tool to aid in crop dry down — but this may not be advised if the field is ready and no frost is forecast.

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  • Disease scouting at harvest

    Harvest and Storage

    Harvest is a great time to assess the incidence and severity of canola diseases, an important step in management for next year.

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  • Rain delays harvest: What to do?

    Harvest and Storage

    Harvest delays due to soggy soils, frequent rains and even mist have canola growers wondering about risk to the crop and what, if anything, they can do reduce these risks. Really, the only approach is to wait out the weather. When fields are able to support the swather, decide then whether the staging suits swathing or straight combining. This article answers these and other questions: What is the “point of no return” for swath timing? Will canola seeds sprout with all the rain? How much does cool, wet weather extend curing time?

    Questions that arise with long rain delays:

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