Harvest and Storage

  • Wildlife go for grain bags

    Harvest and Storage

    Hungry wildlife may have discovered your grain bags and opened them up for a snack. With the ground still frozen, it may be a good time to empty bags if wildlife damage is evident and spoilage is likely.

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  • What to do with canola still out there?

    Harvest and Storage

    Spring harvesting is the best way to remove canola still in the field. Quality will likely be down, but it will still be worth something. Growers may think of alternatives, but they’re probably not as economical.

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  • Check for spoilage

    Harvest and Storage

    This is steam coming off canola heating due to high moisture. This was not a welcome sight for the grower.

    Steam coming out of bin doors or snow melting off one bin while remaining on others is a quick clue — but don’t use these as your only indicators! Spoilage usually starts small. Even with temperature cables, start points are not always detected until some of the grain is already damaged.

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  • What to do with high-moisture canola?

    Harvest and Storage

    Canola harvested tough or damp can be quite volatile in storage. While cool temperature can reduce the risk significantly, keeping the whole bin consistently cool until delivery can be a challenge and a risk. These steps will help improve conditioning results and reduce risk….

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  • ALERT: Canola is heating!

    Harvest and Storage

    Heated canola, the brown burned seeds, mean an immediate downgrade.

    Delivery points report a spike in heated canola. Check all canola bins as soon as possible.

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  • What to do with high-moisture canola?

    Harvest and Storage

    Weather is finally allowing for some harvest to resume across the Prairies, but the concern now is how to handle canola that could come off very tough, or damp. These steps will help improve conditioning results and reduce risk….

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  • How do snow and winter affect canola quality?

    Harvest and Storage

    Snow on canola swaths in Saskatchewan. October 5, 2016. Credit: Ian Epp

    Canola harvested in the spring can have lower weights, lower oil content, higher free fatty acids in the oil and more animal excrement in the harvested sample, which could pose significant challenges from a feed safety perspective. Because the degree of yield or quality degradation is difficult to predict and likely depends on conditions, oilseed processors will assess the physical and intrinsic quality attributes and make a decision as to whether to accept spring-threshed canola at that time.

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  • Factors that elevate storage risk

    Harvest and Storage

    How do moisture, green seeds, weed seeds, hot canola and chaff increase the storage risk?

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  • Bag storage short term, especially for tough canola

    Harvest and Storage

    A clump of spoiled canola from the U of M's bag storage study. This canola went into the bag at 12% moisture. Credit: Angela Brackenreed

    Canola at moisture levels above 12% should only be stored for three to four weeks to avoid deterioration of quality.

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  • Check your bins

    Harvest and Storage

    Moving canola from one bin to another is a good chance to cool it off, break up any potential hot spots and give the grain a good inspection.

    While the priority is on combining for many canola growers this November, please take time to check the storage situation for canola already harvested.

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Canola Watch