Harvest and Storage

  • Time for a mid-winter bin check

    Harvest and Storage

    Extended moments of warmer weather in winter can increase air and moisture movement inside bins. Put a priority on canola with moisture above 8% or higher dockage or green seed levels but take a moment to check in on all bins.

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  • Tough or damp canola: Storage risk

    Harvest and Storage

    Canola harvested at 15% moisture may not last long in storage before spoilage begins. How long is hard to predict. If warm, spoilage could start within a matter of days. If stored cool or cold, canola may last longer without spoilage, but this bin will become very unstable with any stretch of warm weather.

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  • Snow on canola. What to do?

    Harvest and Storage

    Snow on canola swaths in Saskatchewan. October 5, 2016. Credit: Ian Epp

    Common scenarios growers face with the snow on canola are:
    1. Canola is immature when snow falls.

    2. Canola is ready to swath when snow falls.
    3. Canola left standing for straight combining is hit with snow.
    4. Canola in the swath was already dry and has been hit with snow.
    Here is a description of each scenario, along with some tips to help with decision making….

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  • What to do with wind-blown swaths?

    Harvest and Storage

    wind-blown-swaths_cornelsen

    1. Contact crop insurance. 2. Combine once the crop is cured. 3. Think about volunteer management. 4. Consider how this may be prevented.

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  • Slow harvest and storage risk

    Harvest and Storage

    When harvest is slowed by rainy, cool days, combining often occurs in short spurts. In those spurts, the first and last loads of the day are often tough. This can mean an increased storage risk. Condition these bins with aeration to even out moisture and temperature. Consider filling bins to only two-thirds capacity to allow for improved air flow.

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  • Frost hits standing canola. What to do?

    Harvest and Storage

    You have two choices in this situation: Swath now or wait.

    Swathing now might prevent further seed loss if severe frost damage will soon cause pods to pop open and pedicels to snap. You could have shriveled seeds and high green counts, but that might be better than the potential losses from waiting. But if frost did not kill the plants, swathing early will halt any upside potential you’d have from leaving the crop standing to fill out more seeds and clear more green.

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  • Straight cutting tips for leaning and lodged crop

    Harvest and Storage

    Crop with a heavy lean may require some trial and error to test the best angle of attack. Some operators will prefer going perpendicular to the lean; some will prefer going into the lean. With straight cutting, you can go whatever direction works best for crop flow.

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  • Frost forecast and swath timing

    Harvest and Storage

    If frost is forecast, should you swath canola now or leave it standing? The answer depends on (at least) two things: (1) How far advanced is the crop? (2) How cold will it get?

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  • Combine performance expectations for naturally-ripened canola

    Harvest and Storage

    Leaving canola to ripen naturally can work well for straight combining and it saves the extra pass and cost of pre-harvest applications. But canola left to ripen naturally will have somewhat tougher and greener plant material than a swathed crop would, even when seeds are cured and ready to combine.

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  • Residue management: The combine can influence stand establishment

    Harvest and Storage

    Give your future seedbed a good start by managing residue this fall. Here’s how…

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