Green canola

  • Late-harvested canola may have more green

    Green canola

    Green seed small

    Late harvested canola fields that were at various stages of growth when swathed may have high levels of green seed. If that is your situation, here are two articles that may be helpful…

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  • What to do with high green canola

    Green canola

    Crush strips canola grade

    Step one is to know the green count. When shopping around for buyers, make sure your sample represents the canola you’ll deliver. Loads have been rejected because the canola delivered didn’t meet the specifications indicated in the original sample. The Canadian Grain Commission has tips on how to take a representative grain sample.

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  • Don’t wait for green to clear

    Green canola

    Harvest canola combine

    In August and September, growers may want to let canola cure longer hoping for the warm and moist conditions required to clear green from their canola seed. By October, getting the crop off becomes the priority. Green seed is unlikely to turn anymore unless a lot of moisture (snow?) comes, in which case harvest may be delayed until spring. When good harvest days come along, the best option is likely to put canola in the bin.

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  • Reasons for high green

    Green canola

    Green seed small

    Green seed will be a downgrade factor on some fields this year. Those at highest risk tend to be later crops that still had a lot of immature seeds when cold frosts hit two weeks ago. Green that results from a killing frost is locked in, and will not clear no matter how long it cures.

    Rapid drydown due to hot weather can also result in high green seed. In this case, green-clearing enzymes can restart, but seed moisture has to get back up to 20%. This will require a few days of rain and humidity, and continued warm weather.

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  • High green: Will it clear?

    Green canola

    Green seed cropped

    Frost stops the chlorophyll-clearing process in canola seed — usually permanently. High green counts are likely in fields that were not fully mature when the heavy frost hit last week.

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  • Dockage and green elevate storage risk

    Green canola

    Storage and spoilage graph

    Know the quality of the canola going in the bin. Green seeds, weed seeds and dockage increase the risk. Even high quality canola can be at risk if stored hot (temperatures are coming back up so don’t let the snow fool you) or at moisture above 8%. Here are the details…

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  • It’s September 23. Do I cut that green canola?

    Green canola

    swathing canola

    As we progress further into September, growers get more anxious to swath. Swathing at 60% seed colour change is still preferred, but by this date some growers don’t want to wait any longer. Here are some scenarios that may help with the decision to go or wait….

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  • Seed still green but mature

    Green canola

    This time of year, mature canola seeds can take a long time to turn brown or black. Growers wondering why seed colour change is taking so long may want to check the fields again and look for these other signs of maturity….

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  • Early, hot swathing can increase green

    Green canola

    Green seed cropped

    Swathing too early and in hot windy conditions can contribute to high levels of green seed.

    Cutting canola in hot conditions leads to rapid dry down and desiccation, which doesn’t give chlorophyll time to clear from immature seed. Waiting until less mature seed is at least firm to roll between thumb and forefinger will help minimize yield reductions from early swathing, but significant curing will still need to take place in the swath to remove green seed.

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  • Top 10 risky situations for canola storage

    Green canola

    Bin cables give you an easy way to check temperatures inside the core.

    The number one risk: Neglected bins. Growers are busy enough at harvest just getting the crop off, but take time to check all bins within the first two weeks after filling, and then again a couple more times until the canola is cool and winter sets in. Canola seed continues to sweat during the first 4 to 6 weeks after harvest, making this a critical period to move air through the bin and remove that moist air. It cannot always wait until after harvest. Canola can jump from 30°C to 50°C and beyond in two weeks or less.

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