Diseases

  • Muddy fields and clubroot spread

    Diseases

    Those same moist fields that have delayed spring harvest as well as seeding in central Alberta (and some other regions) also mean more mud clinging to equipment. More mud means more clubroot spores riding along on tires and equipment frames. Though the time crunch is on, knocking off as much mud as possible will reduce clubroot spread. In these conditions, fields known to have clubroot spores should be worked last.

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  • Clubroot: Sanitizing used equipment

    Diseases

    Make sure soil is cleaned off any used equipment recently purchased from areas known to have clubroot. This is good biosecurity practice. Ideally, this should be done at the purchase location before bringing it home.

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  • What’s new in blackleg management?

    Diseases

    Using the same disease resistance genetics over and over causes a shift in pathogen population, which can then overcome the resistance in our varieties – similar to herbicide resistance in weeds. Knowing the resistance genetics used in previous years will allow growers to rotate to a different resistance gene and reduce the blackleg infection within a field. As many as 10 new blackleg resistance labels will be applied to varieties in the coming years. They will use these letters A, B, C, D, E₁, E₂, F, G, H, X to identify major resistance genes present.

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  • Blackleg survey results from 2016

    Diseases

    Each Prairie province does its own disease survey most years. The Manitoba Canola Disease Survey has been happening for over 15 years and tracks a variety of diseases. Alberta’s survey the past few years has mainly been focused around monitoring the spread of clubroot. Blackleg results are based on prevalence, incidence and severity — but what do these words mean?

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  • Pest survey results for 2016

    Diseases

    Around 90% of surveyed fields had some sclerotinia stem rot in 2016. This graphs shows the percentage of plants infected (incidence), by province.

    Results from the disease survey show increases in sclerotinia stem rot incidence. Blackleg incidence is down from 2015 in Manitoba and Saskatchewan and up in Alberta.

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  • Post-harvest scouting for verticillium and other diseases

    Diseases

    Verticillium on canola stems. Credit: Justine Cornelsen

    Disease scouting long after swathing is not usually the most accurate, as saprophytic organisms — those that feed on and break down dead material — move in fast and cloud the identification process. Verticillium is one disease that can be more obvious and easier to identify after cutting a canola crop.

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  • Disease load lowers yield expectations

    Diseases

    Clipped cross section shows blackleg at the base of the stem. Credit: Clint Jurke

    After a moist spring and summer in many areas, disease levels in harvest canola could be high this year — even for fields that received a fungicide.

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  • Yield damaging clubroot in CR varieties

    Diseases

    clubroot

    More than 10 clubroot pathotypes have been identified in Alberta, and clubroot-resistant (CR) varieties will not protect against all of them. CR varieties with the same source of resistance grown in a short rotation will quickly select for those pathotypes that are virulent to those varieties. With good moisture for clubroot this year, many fields of CR canola are showing high levels of clubroot infection.

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  • Canola Watch quiz — pre-swath disease check

    Diseases

    Blackleg_woody_crown_ClintJurke600

    Test your disease ID knowledge. Match the disease to these four images…

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  • Pre-harvest scouting: 8 diseases

    Diseases

    Sclerotinia stem rot. Credit: Justine Cornelsen

    Check patches of pre-mature ripened canola to identify the cause. It could be blackleg, clubroot, sclerotinia stem rot (pictured) or something else entirely. Here’s how to identify the major diseases of canola as fields get close to swathing stage…

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Canola Watch